Emily Carr - Art History - Canada - First Nations - B.C. Wilderness - 173 Slides

Emily Carr - Art History - Canada - First Nations - B.C. Wilderness - 173 Slides
Emily Carr - Art History - Canada - First Nations - B.C. Wilderness - 173 Slides
Emily Carr - Art History - Canada - First Nations - B.C. Wilderness - 173 Slides
Emily Carr - Art History - Canada - First Nations - B.C. Wilderness - 173 Slides
Emily Carr - Art History - Canada - First Nations - B.C. Wilderness - 173 Slides
Emily Carr - Art History - Canada - First Nations - B.C. Wilderness - 173 Slides
Emily Carr - Art History - Canada - First Nations - B.C. Wilderness - 173 Slides
Emily Carr - Art History - Canada - First Nations - B.C. Wilderness - 173 Slides
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This is a complete presentation about Canadian Artist Emily Carr. THERE ARE MANY ACTUAL SLIDES FOR YOUR REVIEW IN THE PREVIEW. THIS IS YOUR BEST INDICATION OF PRODUCT QUALITY

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EXCERPT:
This presentation is about artist Emily Carr, one of Canada's most beloved artists and authors. Her art is more timely than ever since its subject matter was native populations, the aboriginal people of Canada, AND the wild wilderness of coastal British Columbia and its constant struggle with preserving itself against the timber industry.

There is a big shift which takes place in Carr’s painting in 1910-1912. Up to this point, Carr had been schooled in art only in America and England. This time she decided to see what the French had to offer. She went to study at the Académie Colarossi in Paris.

In Montparnasse, she met modernist painter Harry Gibb. Upon viewing his work, she was amazed that he used both distortion and a bold color palette.

“Mr. Gibb's landscapes and still life delighted me — brilliant, luscious, clean. Against the distortion of his nudes, I felt revolt.” Emily Carr

She adopted Gibb’s color palette, forsaking the pastel colors of her earlier training. This was excellent because the people of the First Nations certainly did not use pastel colors in anything they made. They too were bold with color and form. The forested coastline of western Canada was hardly known for its pastel hues either. Carr’s palette now matched her future subject matters.

Paris also allowed her to take in the work of the post-impressionists and the Fauvists she met and studied with in France.She added those techniques into her repertoire as well. When she returned to Vancouver, no one was painting like Emily Carr was now painting.
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173 pages
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