Engage NY 2nd Grade, Module 1 Content & Language Objectives, Essential Questions

Engage NY 2nd Grade, Module 1 Content & Language Objectives, Essential Questions
Engage NY 2nd Grade, Module 1 Content & Language Objectives, Essential Questions
Engage NY 2nd Grade, Module 1 Content & Language Objectives, Essential Questions
Engage NY 2nd Grade, Module 1 Content & Language Objectives, Essential Questions
Engage NY 2nd Grade, Module 1 Content & Language Objectives, Essential Questions
Engage NY 2nd Grade, Module 1 Content & Language Objectives, Essential Questions
Engage NY 2nd Grade, Module 1 Content & Language Objectives, Essential Questions
Engage NY 2nd Grade, Module 1 Content & Language Objectives, Essential Questions
Grade Levels
File Type
PDF (542 KB|24 pages)
Standards
$5.00
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  • Product Description
  • Standards
This is for Grade 2, Module 1: Sums and Differences to 100 in the Engage NY Curriculum. This product includes Content Objectives (the objectives listed for each Engage lesson), Language Objectives (how students will use language to discuss the content; I used the WIDA standards and Massachusetts DESE Next Generation ESL Guide as a guideline for how to write these), and and Essential Questions for each lesson. Each page has the aligned standard(s) for the lesson. I post these for every lesson and this helps anchor the lesson. It is good to refer to throughout the lesson. I have seen an increase in oral language development and conceptual understanding of the content since implementing this in my classroom.

Note: I write out sentence frames to use with the Language Objectives and find this very helpful. If you have any questions about how to do that, I can point you in the right direction :) I did not include those in the product because it varies so much based on the individual students.

#content objectives #language objectives #ells #engageny #eureka math #SEI #SIOP #WIDA #I can statements #learning targets
Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. Mathematically proficient students notice if calculations are repeated, and look both for general methods and for shortcuts. Upper elementary students might notice when dividing 25 by 11 that they are repeating the same calculations over and over again, and conclude they have a repeating decimal. By paying attention to the calculation of slope as they repeatedly check whether points are on the line through (1, 2) with slope 3, middle school students might abstract the equation (𝑦 – 2)/(π‘₯ – 1) = 3. Noticing the regularity in the way terms cancel when expanding (π‘₯ – 1)(π‘₯ + 1), (π‘₯ – 1)(π‘₯Β² + π‘₯ + 1), and (π‘₯ – 1)(π‘₯Β³ + π‘₯Β² + π‘₯ + 1) might lead them to the general formula for the sum of a geometric series. As they work to solve a problem, mathematically proficient students maintain oversight of the process, while attending to the details. They continually evaluate the reasonableness of their intermediate results.
Look for and make use of structure. Mathematically proficient students look closely to discern a pattern or structure. Young students, for example, might notice that three and seven more is the same amount as seven and three more, or they may sort a collection of shapes according to how many sides the shapes have. Later, students will see 7 Γ— 8 equals the well remembered 7 Γ— 5 + 7 Γ— 3, in preparation for learning about the distributive property. In the expression π‘₯Β² + 9π‘₯ + 14, older students can see the 14 as 2 Γ— 7 and the 9 as 2 + 7. They recognize the significance of an existing line in a geometric figure and can use the strategy of drawing an auxiliary line for solving problems. They also can step back for an overview and shift perspective. They can see complicated things, such as some algebraic expressions, as single objects or as being composed of several objects. For example, they can see 5 – 3(π‘₯ – 𝑦)Β² as 5 minus a positive number times a square and use that to realize that its value cannot be more than 5 for any real numbers π‘₯ and 𝑦.
Use appropriate tools strategically. Mathematically proficient students consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem. These tools might include pencil and paper, concrete models, a ruler, a protractor, a calculator, a spreadsheet, a computer algebra system, a statistical package, or dynamic geometry software. Proficient students are sufficiently familiar with tools appropriate for their grade or course to make sound decisions about when each of these tools might be helpful, recognizing both the insight to be gained and their limitations. For example, mathematically proficient high school students analyze graphs of functions and solutions generated using a graphing calculator. They detect possible errors by strategically using estimation and other mathematical knowledge. When making mathematical models, they know that technology can enable them to visualize the results of varying assumptions, explore consequences, and compare predictions with data. Mathematically proficient students at various grade levels are able to identify relevant external mathematical resources, such as digital content located on a website, and use them to pose or solve problems. They are able to use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts.
Reason abstractly and quantitatively. Mathematically proficient students make sense of quantities and their relationships in problem situations. They bring two complementary abilities to bear on problems involving quantitative relationships: the ability to decontextualize-to abstract a given situation and represent it symbolically and manipulate the representing symbols as if they have a life of their own, without necessarily attending to their referents-and the ability to contextualize, to pause as needed during the manipulation process in order to probe into the referents for the symbols involved. Quantitative reasoning entails habits of creating a coherent representation of the problem at hand; considering the units involved; attending to the meaning of quantities, not just how to compute them; and knowing and flexibly using different properties of operations and objects.
Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies. By end of Grade 2, know from memory all sums of two one-digit numbers.
Total Pages
24 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
2 Weeks
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