Expository/Persuasive How to T.I.E. Topic, Idea, Example, Explanation, & Ending

Expository/Persuasive  How to T.I.E. Topic, Idea, Example, Explanation, & Ending
Expository/Persuasive  How to T.I.E. Topic, Idea, Example, Explanation, & Ending
Expository/Persuasive  How to T.I.E. Topic, Idea, Example, Explanation, & Ending
Expository/Persuasive  How to T.I.E. Topic, Idea, Example, Explanation, & Ending
Expository/Persuasive  How to T.I.E. Topic, Idea, Example, Explanation, & Ending
Expository/Persuasive  How to T.I.E. Topic, Idea, Example, Explanation, & Ending
Expository/Persuasive  How to T.I.E. Topic, Idea, Example, Explanation, & Ending
Expository/Persuasive  How to T.I.E. Topic, Idea, Example, Explanation, & Ending
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If your STAAR students can remember to use the actual letters in the acronym T.I.E.,they will be able to tie everything together that is required to get a 3 or a 4 from
each grader!

The first page has a colorful outline on how each part of an expository or persuasive essay should look from beginning to end.

Page two will teach them how to connect the key words from several different prompts to determine the topic and their idea. These will be combined to make a clear controlling idea, thesis, or position statement.

Page three gives your kids a chance to see if they can come up with statements of their own using the topic and idea connection. (It will help if they think of the topic like the cause in reading and the idea as the effect.)

Page four and five focus only on one prompt, the importance of honesty. The object in this section is to be able to identify the topic and idea connection, also known as the cause and effect section as mentioned above.

Page six uses one of the statements to form an entire essay using a personal example. Have your students use a box of crayons to make a blue box around the example and underline the part of the explanation that supports and makes a connection to the controlling idea/thesis/position. Have your students follow the same directions for the other three essays as they did for the personal example. Doing this for the rough draft helps your students determine that the specific demands of the prompt are being written about and connected to the controlling idea, thesis/or position statement.


Page seven does the same thing with a hypothetical example.

Page eight has a third statement using current event examples.

Page nine utilizes a historical example to support its controlling idea, thesis/positon statement.

For all of you who have Facebook, I will or already have gone over this entire packet to model the lessons in several videos. You can find me under Bill MacDonald, or type the words May the Fours... and you will see my wall. If you have trouble scrolling down to find the video, use the ask a question section or email me at writing_doctor@yahoo.com, and I can tag you once we become friends.
I put up daily posts on writing, grammar, math, classroom management, motivation, and/or inspiration if you would like to follow or request me as a friend.
Total Pages
9 pages
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