FRENCH/INDIAN WAR-CONST CONVENTION Lessons 21-30/100 American History Curriculum

FRENCH/INDIAN WAR-CONST CONVENTION Lessons 21-30/100 American History Curriculum
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Supplement the textbook and eliminate prep time with these 10 ready-to-use reproducible U.S. history lessons covering important events from the French and Indian War through the Constitutional Convention.

Your 5th or 6th graders will enjoy a wide variety of high-interest activities for individuals, small groups, or the entire class. Among many other things, class members pretend to be delegates at the Second Continental Congress and do a map exercise on major battles of the American Revolution.

Most lessons have four or five activity sheets and can be finished in one or two class periods. Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key provided for each lesson. A majority of the lessons include a 20-question follow-up quiz. The quizzes can also be given as homework assignments or review exercises. Most of the information-filled lessons are able to be used without a textbook.

LESSON/ACTIVITY TITLES (21-30 of 100)
21. The French and Indian War
22. The Declaration of Independence
23. Major Battles of the Revolution
24. Reading: The Winter at Valley Forge
25. The United States in 1783
26. Settlers Cross the Appalachians
27. Famous Person Study Guide
28. Chapter Study Guide
29. The Critical Period
30. The Constitutional Convention

Detailed descriptions of these lessons are provided below.


LESSON 21. The French and Indian War

OBJECTIVE:
To learn about the causes, major events, and results of the French and Indian War.

TIME:
2 class periods

Each student will read the background information about the French and Indian War in the section entitled A Brief Summary of the War.

Each class member will then read the directions for doing a writing assignment about Fort Duquesne and the Battle of Quebec. Once the stories have been written, give a few volunteers the opportunity to read their story to the other students, and earn some extra credit points.

Class members will finish the lesson by doing the Map Exercise (which students always like to do!), and then answer the questions that follow.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.


LESSON 22. The Declaration of Independence

OBJECTIVE:
To become familiar with the contents of the Declaration of Independence and the circumstances which led to its adoption.

TIME:
1 and 1/2 class periods

The lesson begins by giving each student a copy of page 22A and 22C-22E only.

Page 22B is cut it into 13 OPINION CARDS that will be used during the activity. Read with the class the introductory paragraphs and the Voting for Independence section on page 22A. Give one OPINION CARD to each of 13 student volunteers. Start with Connecticut, the first colony on the chart, and have the delegate from Connecticut read the information on their card. Have all class members record the votes “for independence” and “against independence.” After the roll call of all 13 colonies has been completed, briefly discuss the results of the voting.

Have the students read Section I, the introduction to the Declaration of Independence (page 22C), and answer question 1 on page 22E. Have the class read Section II, and answer questions 2 and 3. Assign questions 4-7 for homework.

You can go over the answers at the beginning of the next class period.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.


LESSON 23. Major Battles of the Revolution

OBJECTIVE:
To review major battles and other significant events of the Revolutionary War.

TIME:
2 class periods

Students join pages 23E and 23F together to form a map that they will use to label major battles and other significant events of the Revolutionary War.

Class members then begin the mapping activity by reading a section entitled Battles of Lexington and Concord, which is followed by these directions:

On the map:
(1) Trace Arrow 1 (British) from Boston to Lexington and Concord.
(2) Print April 1775 next to Lexington and Concord.
(3) Color the battle symbol to represent an American victory.

The lesson continues in the same way with students reading several more sections about major battles and events of the Revolutionary War followed by directions for map work.

My students really enjoy this map exercise! I provide them with colored pencils that they can use to represent American vs. British victories, as well as troop movements.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to assess student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.


LESSON 24. Reading: The Winter at Valley Forge

OBJECTIVE:
To understand the plight of the Continental Army during the winter of 1777-1778.

TIME:
1 and 1/2 class periods

After giving each student a copy of pages 24A - 24C, read with the class the background information and the four primary source reading selections.

PRIMARY SOURCE READING # 1:
From the journal of Private James Martin, describing conditions in the Continental Army as the soldiers marched to Valley Forge.

PRIMARY SOURCE READING # 2:
From the journal of Dr. James Thacher, reporting on camp conditions and the leadership of General George Washington.

PRIMARY SOURCE READING # 3:
From the diary of Surgeon Albigence Waldo, written shortly after his arrival at Valley Forge.

PRIMARY SOURCE READING # 4:
From the journal of Chevalier de Pontgibaud, a French volunteer who joined the Continental Army at Valley Forge.

Next, go over the directions for the writing assignment. Have the students complete their stories for the next class period.

At the beginning of the second class period, have several volunteers read their stories to the class.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.


LESSON 25. The United States in 1783

OBJECTIVE:
To review the names and locations of states, cities, waterways, and land areas of the United States in 1783.

TIME:
1 class period

In this fun activity, the class is divided into five teams. Each team tries to identify the states, cities, waterways, and land areas numbered on the map on page 25B. The map shows the United States in 1783, the year Great Britain signed the Treaty of Paris granting independence to its American colonies.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.


LESSON 26. Settlers Cross the Appalachians

OBJECTIVE:
To study the development of the western frontier between the Appalachian Mountains and the Mississippi River.

TIME:
1 and 1/2 class periods

Give each student a copy of pages 26A - 26D.

Have class members work on the map exercise during the first part of the period.

Use the rest of the time for the game. The class will be divided into five teams which will take turns trying to identify the missing words in the following sentences. A correct answer is worth either 10, 20, or 30 points. When a wrong answer is given, the next team in order uses their turn on the same question. If none of the five teams guesses the missing word, the teacher will announce it. Play begins with a person from Team 1 raising their hand to identify the missing word in the first sentence. Team members may not talk over possible answers. The same person cannot answer twice in a row for their team.

If necessary, give the students letter clues, such as the first and/or last letter of an answer.

Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.


LESSON 27. Famous Person Study Guide

OBJECTIVE:
To do an in-depth study of the life and times of an individual associated with American history.

TIME:
Will vary depending on whether students are given class time to work on their report.


This study guide helps students do research on a famous person associated with American history. It can be used multiple times during the school year.

As the teacher, you can decide whether this assignment will be done in or outside of class. Be sure the students have access to reference materials, especially encyclopedias.

Tell the kids that there is more information available on some people than others. When choosing a person, they should check to see if an adequate amount of information is available.

Set a due date.

After the reports have been completed, you may want to have a few volunteers read parts 3 and 4 to the class. These sections require students to give information about the early life of the famous person they chose (before they were famous), as well as their later years after becoming well known.

NOTE: This Famous Person Study Guide can also be used by students who want to do extra credit assignments.

Easy-to-follow Teachers Instructions included.


LESSON 28. Chapter Study Guide

OBJECTIVE:
To emphasize important information about American history found in each chapter of the textbook.

TIME:
Will vary since this lesson is not ordinarily used during class time.

Each student is given a chapter study guide that helps them learn about important people, events, and terms in American history. It can be used with each chapter of the textbook.

Class members interpret pictures, charts, graphs, maps, and other illustrations in their textbook. They will also construct a timeline, and answer key questions.

This study guide can be used with each chapter in the textbook to develop skills while learning about U.S. history.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions included.


LESSON 29. The Critical Period

OBJECTIVE:
To understand the shortcomings of the Articles of Confederation and the reasons for writing a new constitution for the United States.

TIME:
1 class period

You can begin this lesson by reading with the class the introductory paragraphs about the Critical Period.

This is followed by a section on the Articles of Confederation. Students read an outline and underline or highlight the weaknesses in this plan of government.

Next, there is series of yes/no questions about events that did or did not occur during the Critical Period.

A Thought Question concludes the lesson while asking students to identify what they believe were the five most serious weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation.

Teacher Instructions and answer key included.


LESSON 30. The Constitutional Convention

OBJECTIVE:
To study the events which led to the framing and ratification of the Constitution.

TIME:
1 class period

Begin by reading with the class background information about the Constitutional Convention. This includes information about the most well known delegates who attended, including George Washington, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, Gouverneur Morris, and Benjamin Franklin.

Class members are then given a chart showing the main points of disagreement between Convention delegates. They will start with the conflict between the large states and small states over representation in Congress. In column 1, each student reads what each side had to say, then writes their own compromise in column 2 that both sides might have thought was a fair agreement. After students have finished working on the first compromise, ask a few volunteers to read their proposed agreement. Then, give students the actual compromise which can be written in column 3.

Continue in the same way with the other four compromises on the chart (Great Compromise, Three-Fifth Compromise, Slave Trade Compromise, and Commerce Compromise).

Next, read with the class the section on the ratification of the Constitution. Give the kids time to write an answer to the Thought Question pertaining to Federalists and Anti-Federalists. This helps develop critical thinking skills. You can then have a few volunteers read their response to the class.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.
Total Pages
50 pages
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