FULL BUNDLE Comparing Fractions with Pizza

FULL BUNDLE    Comparing Fractions with Pizza
FULL BUNDLE    Comparing Fractions with Pizza
FULL BUNDLE    Comparing Fractions with Pizza
FULL BUNDLE    Comparing Fractions with Pizza
FULL BUNDLE    Comparing Fractions with Pizza
FULL BUNDLE    Comparing Fractions with Pizza
FULL BUNDLE    Comparing Fractions with Pizza
FULL BUNDLE    Comparing Fractions with Pizza
Subject
Grade Levels
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Standards
4 Products in this Bundle
4 products
  1. Students will use play-dough (or draw, use paper etc.) to create and compare "pizza slices" in fourths & eighths.
  2. Students will use play-dough (or draw, use paper etc.) to create and compare "pizza slices" in thirds and sixths.
  3. Students will use play-dough (or draw, use paper etc.) to create and compare "pizza slices" in fourths, eighths. thirds or sixths. They can choose how to divide their pizza as long as the slices are all equal.
  4. Students will use play-dough (or draw, use paper etc.) to create and compare "pizza slices" in equal parts of their choice.
  • Bundle Description
  • StandardsNEW

Students will use play-dough (or draw, use paper etc.) to create and compare "pizza slices" in fourths, eighths, thirds and sixths. Templates to encourage individual investigation of comparing fractions are included.

Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Compare two fractions with different numerators and different denominators, e.g., by creating common denominators or numerators, or by comparing to a benchmark fraction such as 1/2. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.
Explain why a fraction 𝘒/𝘣 is equivalent to a fraction (𝘯 Γ— 𝘒)/(𝘯 Γ— 𝘣) by using visual fraction models, with attention to how the number and size of the parts differ even though the two fractions themselves are the same size. Use this principle to recognize and generate equivalent fractions.
Compare two fractions with the same numerator or the same denominator by reasoning about their size. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.
Recognize and generate simple equivalent fractions, (e.g., 1/2 = 2/4, 4/6 = 2/3). Explain why the fractions are equivalent, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.
Understand two fractions as equivalent (equal) if they are the same size, or the same point on a number line.
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