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Facts to be Mastered: Color Coded for Addition and Multiplication Fact Families

Grade Levels
1st - 4th, Homeschool
Standards
Formats Included
  • PDF
Pages
5 pages

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Learning Objective

Children will use research-based methods to learn math facts

Description

Use these research-based methods to help your students learn!

Why use Facts to be Mastered: Color Coded for Addition and Multiplication Fact Families? Research tells us children learn well when using some specific strategies. These color-coded fact lists come with several suggestions to help the children learn basic facts.

How it works: Children can use these 4 color-coded lists of math facts to help them keep track of the facts they are learning.

Please see THIS BLOG POST for more information about how this game is used.

What’s included: This freebie contains 4 practice guides: 100 addition facts, 100 subtraction facts, 100 multiplication facts, and 100 division facts to be learned. The facts are presented in a color-coded display to help the children see the fact families which research tells us is the best way to learn math facts.

For other Math Activities and Games please see these links:

For Math Freebies please see:

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Total Pages
5 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)
Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem. For example, subtract 10 – 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8.
Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).
Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 - 4 = 13 - 3 - 1 = 10 - 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 - 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

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