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Finding Correlations in Scatter Plot Graphs using Gapminder

Finding Correlations in Scatter Plot Graphs using Gapminder
Finding Correlations in Scatter Plot Graphs using Gapminder
Finding Correlations in Scatter Plot Graphs using Gapminder
Finding Correlations in Scatter Plot Graphs using Gapminder
Grade Levels
File Type

Word Document File

(387 KB|1 page)
Product Rating
4.0
(2 Ratings)
Standards
  • Product Description
  • StandardsNEW

Students are presented with a series of scatter plots and asked to create a title and assess the type of correlation (strong, weak, positive, negative, no correlation). Students are also asked to write a brief main idea of what the graph is showing and support it with evidence.

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Understand that patterns of association can also be seen in bivariate categorical data by displaying frequencies and relative frequencies in a two-way table. Construct and interpret a two-way table summarizing data on two categorical variables collected from the same subjects. Use relative frequencies calculated for rows or columns to describe possible association between the two variables. For example, collect data from students in your class on whether or not they have a curfew on school nights and whether or not they have assigned chores at home. Is there evidence that those who have a curfew also tend to have chores?
Know that straight lines are widely used to model relationships between two quantitative variables. For scatter plots that suggest a linear association, informally fit a straight line, and informally assess the model fit by judging the closeness of the data points to the line.
Construct and interpret scatter plots for bivariate measurement data to investigate patterns of association between two quantities. Describe patterns such as clustering, outliers, positive or negative association, linear association, and nonlinear association.
Understand that statistics can be used to gain information about a population by examining a sample of the population; generalizations about a population from a sample are valid only if the sample is representative of that population. Understand that random sampling tends to produce representative samples and support valid inferences.
Total Pages
1 page
Answer Key
Not Included
Teaching Duration
30 minutes
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