First Grade Daily Calendar & Math Review Booklet: February

First Grade Daily Calendar & Math Review Booklet:  February
First Grade Daily Calendar & Math Review Booklet:  February
First Grade Daily Calendar & Math Review Booklet:  February
First Grade Daily Calendar & Math Review Booklet:  February
First Grade Daily Calendar & Math Review Booklet:  February
First Grade Daily Calendar & Math Review Booklet:  February
First Grade Daily Calendar & Math Review Booklet:  February
First Grade Daily Calendar & Math Review Booklet:  February
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(10 MB|35 pages)
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  1. First Grade Daily Calendar & Review Math Booklet Bundle! Students practice calendar skills; report the daily weather; work on money skills; review math skills; and write, draw and answer story problems for each of the twelve months of the year.Resource Prep: You can copy the calendar with colore
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Do you need a great math class starter? Well, this is the resource for you. This February First Grade Daily Review Math Booklet! Students practice calendar skills; report the daily weather; work on money skills;review math skills; and write, draw and answer story problems.

Resource Prep: You can copy the calendar with colored ink or on colored paper. Copy the rest of the month’s booklet pages on regular copy paper. Staple calendar, weather report sheet, and student pages together. Note: I copied these booklet back to back, the calendar and weather report can be placed back to back and then the student pages can be copied back to back. I also copied these booklets months in advanced, a great job for those parent room helpers or volunteers.

Resource Includes the Following:

★ Monthly Calendar: Colored and Black & White Copies Available

★ Weather Report Sheet

★ Student Daily Review & Story Problem Sheets: 25 sheets available

★ Example Student Page

Resource Directions:

Monthly Calendar: Choose which copy of the calendar you would like to have for your students and copy enough for your students. The first day of the month with a new booklet, have students write their names on top of calendar and decorate the top if you chose the black & white version for copying.

Each day have students place the date in the small box that is in the upper right side of each box on the calendar. In the remainder space for the date you can either do the calendar pattern you may have up on your classroom calendar; put a picture representing special days: birthdays, assemblies, holidays, etc.; or write words or draw pictures representing what you have or will do that day: activity like gym or music; lesson learned, or other special activity.

Weather Report Sheet: Students decide which picture best represents the weather on that day: sunny; windy; rainy; cloudy; foggy; or snowy. At the end of the month we would tally each row to see how many days of each weather item we had, discussing which weather we had most of and which weather we had least of.

Student Daily Review & Story Problem Sheets: There are 25 worksheets available. There will be extra sheets available depending how many days of school you had for this month. You can have students do the extra sheets if you choose to in class or at home. Each student sheet has the following:

→ Date & Numbers of Days in School: Students writes out the date and numbers of days you have been in school on the appropriate lines.

→ Daily Cumulative Math Skills Review: Students are asked to answer 2 – 6 math problems as a review. Students practice skills they have already been exposed to. They may need assistant reading the directions to some of the problems but should be able to do problem independently.

→ Date in Money: Students are asked to write the date as if it were money and then draw the coins that could be used to make that amount. For example: If the date is the 22nd of the month, students write out 22¢ and then draw out the money how they choose to represent the amount. You can certainly have

a discussion about the easiest way to make the amount or how others made their amounts.

→ Problem of the Day: Students are asked to answer 1 or 2 story problems. These will need to be read to students at first and then toward the middle or end of the school year, students should be able to do them on their own. Read the story problems together, discuss what is being asked and then students are to draw out the problem, write an equation if needed and then answer the question in the space provided.

Example Student Page: Example of how student page is done is after this direction page.

Kids have monthly math fun while reviewing and learning a variety of math skills!



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Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = ▯ - 3, 6 + 6 = ▯.
Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6 = 6, 7 = 8 - 1, 5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2.
Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 - 4 = 13 - 3 - 1 = 10 - 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 - 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).
Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).
Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem. For example, subtract 10 – 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8.
Total Pages
35 pages
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N/A
Teaching Duration
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