First Grade Number Sense Math Games

Mrs Wheeler
12.5k Followers
Grade Levels
K - 2nd, Homeschool
Standards
Formats Included
  • PDF
Pages
32 pages
$5.50
$5.50
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Mrs Wheeler
12.5k Followers

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  1. Help your little ones develop strong Math skills with my "Math Games on the Fly" Bundle! These games are all printable in black and white and do not require any cutting or laminating! Hooray! Most of the games included have two or three options {easy, on-level, advanced} for differentiation. The
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Description

Help your little ones develop a strong number sense with this "Math Games on the Fly" set! These games are all printable in black and white and do not require any cutting or laminating! Hooray! Most of the games included have two options {easy and on-level} for differentiation. These games are great for fast finishers, centers, substitutes, supplementing your current Math curriculum, or just those "on the fly" moments! I keep sets of mine copied and ready for use! This pack is appropriate for grades K-1 and would make a good RTI supplement for grade 2. See how I use these here: http://mrswheelerfirst.blogspot.com/2014/09/math-games-on-fly.html

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Total Pages
32 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = ▯ - 3, 6 + 6 = ▯.
Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 - 4 = 13 - 3 - 1 = 10 - 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 - 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).
Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).
Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem. For example, subtract 10 – 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8.
Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)

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