Fourth Grade Smarties Fractions Activity - Equivalent, Simplest Form, Comparing

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36 Ratings
Learning with Miss LaGrow
4.1k Followers
Grade Levels
4th - 5th
Resource Type
Standards
Formats Included
  • PDF
Pages
3 pages
$2.50
$2.50
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Learning with Miss LaGrow
4.1k Followers

Description

Need fun 4th grade fraction activities or lesson with candy? Review equivalent fractions, simplest form, comparing fractions, and more with this three page hands-on activity with Smarties (American version)!

Skills Included: (4th Grade CCSS Aligned)

-Sorting into Like Groups

-Writing Fractions

-Equivalent Fractions

-Simplest Form

-Comparing Fractions (like denominators)

-Writing Fractions on Number Lines

-Adding Fractions (like denominators)

**Bonus Challenge question included. Word problem compares two fractions of unlike denominators.

Total Pages
3 pages
Answer Key
Does not apply
Teaching Duration
1 hour
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Explain why a fraction 𝘢/𝘣 is equivalent to a fraction (𝘯 × 𝘢)/(𝘯 × 𝘣) by using visual fraction models, with attention to how the number and size of the parts differ even though the two fractions themselves are the same size. Use this principle to recognize and generate equivalent fractions.
Compare two fractions with different numerators and different denominators, e.g., by creating common denominators or numerators, or by comparing to a benchmark fraction such as 1/2. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.
Add and subtract mixed numbers with like denominators, e.g., by replacing each mixed number with an equivalent fraction, and/or by using properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction.

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