Fraction Operations Bundle

Fraction Operations Bundle
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4 Products in this Bundle
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  1. A self-checking, matching activity for students to practice writing fraction expressions from word problems before solving them. All four operations are used including two division problems. The numbers are all the same so students need to think about what the problem is asking to determine the oper
  2. Self Checking Scavenger Hunt that can be completed independently or in pairs. The activity includes 8 different problems where students multiply proper fractions. Some answers must be simplified or converted to mixed numbers.Students start at any card. They record the letter in the first space aft
  3. Students multiply 12 mixed numbers in this trail/scavenger hunt activity. Several of the answers must be simplified and/or converted back to mixed numbers. Self-checking and more fun than a traditional worksheet! Can be used as an in class activity, homework or sub plan!Directions:Multiply the fra
  4. Students divide 12 fraction problems in this trail/scavenger hunt activity. Problems include dividing a fraction by a fraction, whole number by fraction, fraction by whole number and mixed numbers. Several of the answers must be simplified and/or converted back to mixed numbers. Self-checking and
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Bundle includes 4 fraction operations activities. All activities are self-checking, can be done independently or with partners and are more fun than traditional worksheets! Activity 1 includes all 4 operations including word problems, activities 2 and 3 practice multiplying fractions and activity four practices dividing fractions.

Activity 1: A self-checking, matching activity for students to practice writing fraction expressions from word problems before solving them. All four operations are used including two division problems. The numbers are all the same so students need to think about what the problem is asking to determine the operation needed to solve.

Students will match the word problem with the correct expression, answer and label. Students can shade the matching squares the same color or use a symbol or drawing like a star or smiley face to match all four boxes together. There are 5 different sets of problems with 4 matching pieces each.

Activity 2: Multiplying Fractions scavenger hunt. Students start at any card. They record the letter in the first space after the word β€œPath” at the bottom of the page. They solve the problem in the box that has the same letter as the card. Students then go look for the answer they got at the top of a different card after the words β€œif you got…”. When they find the card, they record the letter on the next line at the bottom of the page showing their path. Solve the problem in the correct lettered box and repeat the process. The last card they solve should take them back to the beginning or the first card they started with. This is a great self-checking tool for students. If they cannot find their answer or they go back to the beginning too soon, then they know they made a mistake and should go back and check their work.

Activity 3: Multiplying mixed numbers trail/scavenger hunt. Multiply the fractions and then simplify and/or write the product as a mixed number. Students solve the 1st problem and find the answer in the gray heading of one of the other problems. Write a β€œ2” in the box in the bottom left corner and then complete that problem. Repeat the process, writing a β€œ3” in the third problem, following the trail until all of the problems are complete and you have returned to the start. The 12th problem completed should take the students back to the problem they started with. If it does not or they go back before completing all of the other problems, then they made a mistake somewhere.

Activity 4: Dividing fractions and mixed numbers trail/scavenger hunt. Divide the fractions and then simplify and/or write the product as a mixed number. Students solve the 1st problem and find the answer in the gray heading of one of the other problems. Write a β€œ2” in the box in the bottom left corner and then complete that problem. Repeat the process, writing a β€œ3” in the third problem, following the trail until all of the problems are complete and you have returned to the start. The 12th problem completed should take the students back to the problem they started with. If it does not or they go back before completing all of the other problems, then they made a mistake somewhere.

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Interpret and compute quotients of fractions, and solve word problems involving division of fractions by fractions, e.g., by using visual fraction models and equations to represent the problem. For example, create a story context for (2/3) Γ· (3/4) and use a visual fraction model to show the quotient; use the relationship between multiplication and division to explain that (2/3) Γ· (3/4) = 8/9 because 3/4 of 8/9 is 2/3. (In general, (𝘒/𝘣) Γ· (𝘀/π˜₯) = 𝘒π˜₯/𝘣𝘀.) How much chocolate will each person get if 3 people share 1/2 lb of chocolate equally? How many 3/4-cup servings are in 2/3 of a cup of yogurt? How wide is a rectangular strip of land with length 3/4 mi and area 1/2 square mi?
Solve real world problems involving multiplication of fractions and mixed numbers, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem.
Interpret the product (𝘒/𝘣) Γ— 𝘲 as a parts of a partition of 𝘲 into 𝘣 equal parts; equivalently, as the result of a sequence of operations 𝘒 Γ— 𝘲 Γ· 𝘣. For example, use a visual fraction model to show (2/3) Γ— 4 = 8/3, and create a story context for this equation. Do the same with (2/3) Γ— (4/5) = 8/15. (In general, (𝘒/𝘣) Γ— (𝘀/π˜₯) = 𝘒𝘀/𝘣π˜₯.)
Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction or whole number by a fraction.
Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions referring to the same whole, including cases of unlike denominators, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem. Use benchmark fractions and number sense of fractions to estimate mentally and assess the reasonableness of answers. For example, recognize an incorrect result 2/5 + 1/2 = 3/7, by observing that 3/7 < 1/2.
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