Free Press Presentation - First Amendment - PLUS Jeopardy Game - 123 Slides

Free Press Presentation - First Amendment - PLUS Jeopardy Game - 123 Slides
Free Press Presentation - First Amendment - PLUS Jeopardy Game - 123 Slides
Free Press Presentation - First Amendment - PLUS Jeopardy Game - 123 Slides
Free Press Presentation - First Amendment - PLUS Jeopardy Game - 123 Slides
Free Press Presentation - First Amendment - PLUS Jeopardy Game - 123 Slides
Free Press Presentation - First Amendment - PLUS Jeopardy Game - 123 Slides
Free Press Presentation - First Amendment - PLUS Jeopardy Game - 123 Slides
Free Press Presentation - First Amendment - PLUS Jeopardy Game - 123 Slides
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This is a complete presentation about Free Press under the 1st Amendment to the Constitution. With the presentation are a series of flashcards for review and class discussion Plus a 20 point multiple choice test. In August 2017, I added an enhancement to this show: the landmark First Amendment internet communications case fought between the US government and the ACLU. This case is now included herein in Jeopardy Game Format.

THERE ARE MANY ACTUAL SLIDES FOR YOUR REVIEW IN THE PREVIEW. THIS IS YOUR BEST INDICATION OF PRODUCT QUALITY.

This is a presentation of American defamation law which is rooted in the First Amendment. The landmark case is "NYTimes v. Sullivan" which is followed by "Gertz v. John Birch Society" and "Hustler v. Fallwell." We wind up the presentation with the latest issues, which are: internet defamation, the new Speech Act and the concept of Libel Tourism.

The author is a retired lawyer, instructor and textbook author.

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EXCERPT
The free speech and free press clauses give the same protection to speakers as to writers. Individuals are protected when expressing themselves through publication and dissemination of information. Their ideas and opinions cannot be interfered with by the government. "Branzburg v. Hayes" was a key case recognizing free press as "a fundamental personal right."

The right is given broad interpretation so as to cover all media, including newspapers, books, plays, movies, and video games. Bloggers and Social Media users are covered by both free speech and free press.

These protections do not make any distinction between media businesses and nonprofessional speakers. They are all covered. The Supreme Court consistently gives the same level of protection to a journalism behemoth like the "Washington" Post as it does to the everyday Joe writing about his neighborhood.
Total Pages
123 pages
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