Friends of Ten Scoot ~ Addition Fluency Game

Friends of Ten Scoot ~ Addition Fluency Game
Friends of Ten Scoot ~ Addition Fluency Game
Friends of Ten Scoot ~ Addition Fluency Game
Friends of Ten Scoot ~ Addition Fluency Game
Friends of Ten Scoot ~ Addition Fluency Game
Friends of Ten Scoot ~ Addition Fluency Game
Friends of Ten Scoot ~ Addition Fluency Game
Friends of Ten Scoot ~ Addition Fluency Game
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(18 MB)
Standards
  • Product Description
  • Standards
Scoot is a fun, engaging, active game that kids love to play again and again.

This download contains 4 variations of scoot games to practice or reinforce making combinations of 10 - such an important skill in first grade! Please click the PREVIEW button above to see the cards included.

The variations are: ten frame, simple number, missing addend & spinner. Do them separately or mix it up for more of a challenge. Each set contains 24 task cards. If you have more than 24 students you could make some "brain break" stations. The recording sheet is also included.

Scoot makes a great informal assessment or progress monitoring activity - kids don't know they being assessed because it feels like a game #winner. Just make sure they really know how the game works before using it as an assessment tool.

**This used to be a freebie but unfortunately it violated TPT's freebie guidelines by having too many pages so I've made it a paid product. The ten-frame version is still available as a freebie if you want to try it out. You can find it HERE. Apologies if you were looking for the full free version.

If you're looking for more CCSS aligned math activities click HERE

You might also be interested in:
Calendar Notebook for the Entire Year
Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 - 4 = 13 - 3 - 1 = 10 - 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 - 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).
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