Futurism Art History ~ 162 Slides ~ Futurist Art Presentation

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Futurism Art History ~ 162 Slides ~ Futurist Art Presentation

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This is a complete presentation on FUTURIST art history which is highly visual and thoroughly annotated. My preview is 16 of the slides in the presentation for you to download. This will give you the best idea of what the product is like. There are also 4 pop up thumbnails which go with this listing and the below text excerpts.

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Futurism (Italian: Futurismo) was an artistic and social movement that originated in Italy in the early 20th century. It emphasized speed, technology, youth, and violence, and objects such as the car, the aeroplane, and the industrial city.

Started as Italian phenomenon but there were parallel movements in Russia, England, and elsewhere.

Futurism looks like an animated version of Cubism because of the “movement” which it gave its images. Cubism contributed to the formation of Italian Futurism's artistic style.

The Futurists did not like the Cubists’ focus on inanimate objects to be found in an art studio. They were interested in what was going on in life outside the art studio.

The machines of modern life, especially those with speed attached to them, such as trains and automobiles, attracted them.

In today’s world, one might be tempted to think that Futurist artists used a wind machine, such as is used in fashion shoots, for the poses. They had no such device.

While Cubists broke apart or “fractured” objects in their paintings, the Futurists fractured energy and motion. Cubism gave the Futurists the method for analyzing energy in paintings and expressing dynamism.

The Futurists stuck to the colors of the Post Impressionists, which fairly leaped off the canvas, rather than going with the drab colors generally used by Cubists.

For those artists who stuck with Futurism beyond its Big Time in the earliest part of the 20th Century, the decades showed change in focus: 1910s, fractured elements; 1920s, machines, and 1930s, aerial imagery. Gertrude Stein on Futurism: “It made a great deal of noise. Everybody was excited, and this show being given in a well known gallery, everybody went.” (1912 Futurist exhibition at the Bernheim-Jeune Gallery in Paris)

Manifesto writer Marinetti declared the Futurists’ greatest visual innovation was “lines of force.”

Marinetti extolled the visual, pulsating beauty of speed and the Futurist artists listened.

While there are many movements which hinge on the artistic qualities of the natural world, Futurism blatantly celebrated machines and technology, preferring them to nature.

Had computers and the internet existed then, the Futurists would have embraced every aspect of them. The speed of internet connections would have fascinated them.

Some used Futurism to convey political beliefs. Today Futurism is looked at as a visual style with little reference to its long ago politics.

Its politics were best forgotten as they tended toward Fascism, bigotry, sexism and a love of war and violence. It was the only twentieth century avant-garde movement to adhere to far right politics.

“Technical Manifesto of Futurist Painting” states that, "On account of the persistency of an image upon the retina, moving objects constantly multiply themselves; their form changes like rapid vibrations, in their mad career. Thus a running horse has not four legs, but twenty, and their movements are triangular.”

In the Futurist paintings, there are more than the usual number of “limbs” or “wings” because they are blurred and used to suggest motion. This is also how animation and movies work. They too are based upon many still images moving very fast.

Because of Futurism’s association with the Fascists, it finally died a complete death after WWII since the Fascists had been thoroughly defeated. The movement had waxed and waned in the decades up to that point.

Futurism remains a part of modern Western culture. The emphasis on youth, speed, power and technology are fully within present day cinema. Ridley Scott designed his film “Blade Runner” around Futurist art.

The Russian Futurists as a group brought art into their daily lives. They painted symbols on their faces, usually hieroglyphics or flowers. They also saw themselves as Cubo-Futurists and not just Futurists. They did not have the offensive ideology of the Italian Fascist Futurists either.
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Futurism Art History ~ 162 Slides ~ Futurist Art Presentation
Futurism Art History ~ 162 Slides ~ Futurist Art Presentation
Futurism Art History ~ 162 Slides ~ Futurist Art Presentation
Futurism Art History ~ 162 Slides ~ Futurist Art Presentation