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Interactive resources you can assign in your digital classroom from TpT.
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Easel Activities
Pre-made digital activities. Add highlights, virtual manipulatives, and more.
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Quizzes with auto-grading that will be available for purchase on TpT soon.
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Geoboards Task Cards

My Happy Place
10.3k Followers
Grade Levels
PreK - 1st, Homeschool
Subjects
Standards
Formats Included
  • PDF
Pages
35 pages
$3.75
$3.75
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My Happy Place
10.3k Followers

Also included in

  1. This is a bundle of four sets of Geoboard task cards. These sets include printable task cards that are designed to be laminated and used with 5x5 peg geoboards and various sized rubber bands. Each set includes color and black and white versions of the cards in addition to printable recording sheets.
    $12.00
    $15.00
    Save $3.00

Description

Set up an easy math center with these printable task cards and recording sheets. This set supports your teaching of geometry in the classroom by allowing students to build two dimensional shapes on geoboards.

This set is part of a money-saving bundle. Check it out here!

This set includes 30 geoboard design task cards for students to replicate on their own geoboards. I have also included a blank geoboard task card for you to draw your own designs. These cards feature a 5x5 peg geoboard and are best used with a variety of sizes of rubber bands.

The task cards can be used alone as a springboard for creation. I have also included two recording sheets and a planning sheet for those teachers who want to have an accountability element in their center.

**Update 1/27/2017** This set now includes a black and white version of the task cards set in addition to the color version.

Please see the preview file for more detailed images. If you have any questions, you can use the “Ask a Question” feature on my store page or email me at MyHappyPlaceTeachingProducts@gmail.com.

For more geoboards task cards, see these Animals cards!

You might also like: Patterning With Pony Beads Task Cards

or Paper Chains Sequencing Center

For more geometry practice, check out my Geometry for Kindergarten.

For more math products, click here.

I would love to have you as a follower! Click the green star to be the first to know about new products and freebies! 

Thank you for shopping!

Susan Jennings (My Happy Place)

Total Pages
35 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
Lifelong tool
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Attend to precision. Mathematically proficient students try to communicate precisely to others. They try to use clear definitions in discussion with others and in their own reasoning. They state the meaning of the symbols they choose, including using the equal sign consistently and appropriately. They are careful about specifying units of measure, and labeling axes to clarify the correspondence with quantities in a problem. They calculate accurately and efficiently, express numerical answers with a degree of precision appropriate for the problem context. In the elementary grades, students give carefully formulated explanations to each other. By the time they reach high school they have learned to examine claims and make explicit use of definitions.
Use appropriate tools strategically. Mathematically proficient students consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem. These tools might include pencil and paper, concrete models, a ruler, a protractor, a calculator, a spreadsheet, a computer algebra system, a statistical package, or dynamic geometry software. Proficient students are sufficiently familiar with tools appropriate for their grade or course to make sound decisions about when each of these tools might be helpful, recognizing both the insight to be gained and their limitations. For example, mathematically proficient high school students analyze graphs of functions and solutions generated using a graphing calculator. They detect possible errors by strategically using estimation and other mathematical knowledge. When making mathematical models, they know that technology can enable them to visualize the results of varying assumptions, explore consequences, and compare predictions with data. Mathematically proficient students at various grade levels are able to identify relevant external mathematical resources, such as digital content located on a website, and use them to pose or solve problems. They are able to use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts.
Model with mathematics. Mathematically proficient students can apply the mathematics they know to solve problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace. In early grades, this might be as simple as writing an addition equation to describe a situation. In middle grades, a student might apply proportional reasoning to plan a school event or analyze a problem in the community. By high school, a student might use geometry to solve a design problem or use a function to describe how one quantity of interest depends on another. Mathematically proficient students who can apply what they know are comfortable making assumptions and approximations to simplify a complicated situation, realizing that these may need revision later. They are able to identify important quantities in a practical situation and map their relationships using such tools as diagrams, two-way tables, graphs, flowcharts and formulas. They can analyze those relationships mathematically to draw conclusions. They routinely interpret their mathematical results in the context of the situation and reflect on whether the results make sense, possibly improving the model if it has not served its purpose.
Model shapes in the world by building shapes from components (e.g., sticks and clay balls) and drawing shapes.
Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes, and describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as above, below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to.

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