Grade 1, "Math Bundle" for Visually Impaired

Grade 1, "Math Bundle" for Visually Impaired
Grade 1, "Math Bundle" for Visually Impaired
Grade 1, "Math Bundle" for Visually Impaired
Grade 1, "Math Bundle" for Visually Impaired
Grade 1, "Math Bundle" for Visually Impaired
Grade 1, "Math Bundle" for Visually Impaired
Grade 1, "Math Bundle" for Visually Impaired
Grade 1, "Math Bundle" for Visually Impaired
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    1. This educational resource pack includes:Visual Impairment or Blindness Teaching Strategies★ Terminology★ Considerations and Instructional Strategies★ Categories with examples, assessments and treatments★ Interactive Strategies with practical ideasPlus links to additional worksheets for students with
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    2. K - 2 Bundle for Students with Visual ImpairmentsInstructors who use this variety of instructional modes will enhance learning for Students with Visual Impairments.Accessibility suggestions: Go to your device “Settings” where you can adjust the screen’s: brightness and color, size of text, resolutio
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    • Bundle Description
    • Standards

    For First Grade Students with Visual Impairments

    Instructors who use this variety of instructional modes will enhance learning for students with Visual Impairments. This worksheet is designed for "low vision" students; referring to a severe vision loss in distance and near vision. Students use a combination of vision and other senses to learn, and they may require adaptations in lighting or the print size, and, in some cases, braille.

    Please be prepared to cut-out the counting objects if the student is not able.

    A media player for wav or m4a files is required to listen to audio links.

    Click on icons for audio.

    Here is a link for teaching strategies for students with Visual Impairments: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/VI-Visual-Impairment-or-Blindness-Teaching-Strategies-142576

    Accessibility suggestions: Go to your device “Settings” where you can adjust the screen’s: brightness and color, size of text, resolution, connect to wireless display and adjust sound.

    This educational resource pack includes the following:

    Measurement and Data

    Measurement and data measure lengths indirectly and by iterating length units.

    Common Core Requirements:

    “Order three objects by length; compare the lengths of two objects indirectly by using a third object

    Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units, by laying multiple copies of a shorter object (the length unit) end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit to contexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole number of length units with no gaps or overlaps.

    Tell and write time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks

    Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories; ask and answer questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, and how many more or less are in one category than in another.”

    Numbers and Operations Base 10

    COUNTING (Worksheet 1): “Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral.”

    PLACE VALUES (Worksheets 2-5): “Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. Understand the following as special cases:

    10 can be thought of as a bundle of ten ones — called a "ten."

    The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

    The numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones)."

    COMPARISON (Worksheets 6, 8-9): “Compare two two-digit numbers based on meanings of the tens and ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and <.”

    ADDITION (Worksheets 7-9): “Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.”

    MENTAL MATH (Worksheet 10): “Given a two-digit number, mentally find 10 more or 10 less than the number, without having to count; explain the reasoning used.”

    SUBTRACTION (Worksheet 11): “Subtract multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 from multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (positive or zero differences), using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used.”

    Geometric Shapes

    Geometry - Reason with shapes and their attributes:

    Distinguish between defining attributes (e.g., triangles are closed and three-sided) versus non-defining attributes (e.g., color, orientation, overall size); build and draw shapes to possess defining attributes.

    Compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangles, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, and quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new shapes from the composite shape. (Note: Students do not need to learn formal names such as “right rectangular prism.”)

    Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, fourths, and quarters, and use the phrases half of, fourth of, and quarter of.

    Describe the whole as two of, or four of the shares. Understand for these examples that decomposing into more equal shares creates smaller shares.

    Operations and Algebraic Thinking

    Understanding addition as putting together and adding to, and understand subtraction as taking apart and taking from. Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, sounds (e.g., claps), acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.

    Operations and Algebraic Thinking - represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.

    Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

    Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. understand and apply properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction.

    Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. (Note: Students need not use formal terms for these properties.) Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)

    Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem. For example, subtract 10 – 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8. add and subtract within 20.

    Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).

    Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13). Work with addition and subtraction equations.

    Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6 = 6, 7 = 8 – 1, 5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2.

    Identifying Bill Amounts

    Math - Identify bill amounts including $1.00, $5.00, $10.00, and $20.00.

    Students will be given four levels of difficulty based on their individualized educational needs.

    1. Sort bills from other objects.

    2. Sort $1.00, $5.00, $10.00, and $20.00 bills.

    3. Identify bill amounts including $1.00, $5.00, $10.00, and $20.00.

    4. Identify and count bills including $1.00, $5.00, $10.00, and $20.00.

    Students with hearing impairments may use speech, lip reading, hearing aids and/or amplification systems to enhance oral communication. Headphones with blue tooth compatibility can also improve their mobility. However, it helps to use visual aids whenever possible, including captioned versions of videos and films. Also, provide unfamiliar vocabulary in written form, on the blackboard, or in a handout.

    Wendy the Blind Witch - Math and Reading Activity Story

    K-2 Text Exemplar: An original story with math lesson, “Wendy the Blind Witch.”

    • Fill in the Blanks Tests with Answers Key;
    • ESSA -Well -Rounded concept: Reading, Writing, Literature and Math
    • “Wendy the Blind Witch” Guided Writing Practice (Key Words model) including: touch correct braille letter/number or recite correct answers.
    • Teacher can use completed worksheets or video of student reactions as proof of completion.
    • Red print relates to notes for the teacher, parent or self-instruction. The purchase of tennis balls and muffin pans are needed to replicate braille.
    • Certificate of Achievement is available for students that finish the resource pack satisfactorily.

    “Stone Soup School. com provides digital educational strategies for every student based on their abilities.”

    Here is a link to additional worksheets for students with Visual Impairments or Blindness: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/My-Products/Category:356867/sort:Item.rating/direction:desc

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    Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
    Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, fourths, and quarters, and use the phrases half of, fourth of, and quarter of. Describe the whole as two of, or four of the shares. Understand for these examples that decomposing into more equal shares creates smaller shares.
    Compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangles, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, and quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new shapes from the composite shape.
    Distinguish between defining attributes (e.g., triangles are closed and three-sided) versus non-defining attributes (e.g., color, orientation, overall size); build and draw shapes to possess defining attributes.
    Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = ▯ - 3, 6 + 6 = ▯.
    Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6 = 6, 7 = 8 - 1, 5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2.
    Total Pages
    92 pages
    Answer Key
    Included
    Teaching Duration
    N/A
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