Easel by TpT
DID YOU KNOW:
Seamlessly assign resources as digital activities

Learn how in 5 minutes with a tutorial resource. Try it Now  

Gravity in Galaxies and The Solar System: NGSS MS ESS1-2

Grade Levels
6th - 8th
Standards
Formats Included
  • Zip
Pages
42 pages
$6.00
$6.00
Share this resource

Also included in

  1. This bundle for Earth and Space Science for middle school NGSS covers all the standards for Middle School Earth’s Place in the Universe. Students will develop models of the Earth-Sun-Moon system, explain gravity in galaxies, and determine the scale and properties of objects in the solar system. This
    $29.60
    $34.50
    Save $4.90

Learning Objective

Students will make a model to describe the role of gravity in the motions within galaxies and in the solar system.

Description

Students will love these activities on gravity in the solar system. Students will make a model to describe the role of gravity in the motions within galaxies and in the solar system. Gravity and inertia are what are keeping the whole solar system in place!

This Unit Includes:

  • three pages of reading passages
  • comprehension questions
  • lab and lab directions
  • lab write-ups
  • demonstration
  • lesson plans
  • response sheets
  • Interactive notebook flaps
  • QR code research
  • quiz
  • answer keys

This resource is aligned with NGSS MS ESS1-2

Develop and use a model to describe the role of gravity in the motions within galaxies and the solar system.

From the Earth’s Place in the Universe in the  Next Generation Science Standards

NGSS MS ESS1-2

Develop and use a model to describe the role of gravity in the motions within galaxies and the solar system.

The nonfiction passages are also aligned with Reading Informational Text Standards for CCSS.

Students will be able to define both gravity and inertia and they will learn a little about the scientists who contributed to these ideas.

Science Concepts Taught in this Unit:

Gravity

Gravity in space

Objects in motion stay in motion unless a force acts upon them

Objects at rest stay at rest unless a force acts upon them

Objects with large masses in space bend the fabric of space- we experience this as gravity

The greater the mass of an object, the greater the gravitational pull

The greater the distance between objects the less the gravitational pull

Size and distance in the universe

Research on Planets and other Celestial Bodies in Solar System

Milky Way Galaxy

Save 20% by purchasing in a bundle: Earth's Place in the Universe

Created by Lynda R. Williams

Teaching Science With Lynda

Science and Engineering Practices Used By Students

  • Asking questions or defining problems
  • Developing and using models
  • Planning and carrying out investigations
  • Analyzing and interpreting data
  • Constructing explanations and designing solutions
  • Engaging in argument from evidence
  • Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information


* My resources are secure and not editable for copyright reasons. 

Would you like more information on teaching Gravity and Inertia in Space

These resources are created by Lynda R. Williams at Teaching Science

Follow me and get news of my new resources.  Each new resource is discounted by 50% for the first 24 hours! 

See more of my resource from NGSS

Earth, Moon and Sun System: Developing Models NGSS MS ESS1-1

Weather and Climate Complete Middle School Bundle

Middle School Ecosystem NGSS Bundle

Total Pages
42 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
2 Weeks
Report this Resource to TpT
Reported resources will be reviewed by our team. Report this resource to let us know if this resource violates TpT’s content guidelines.

Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
NGSSMS-ESS1-2
Develop and use a model to describe the role of gravity in the motions within galaxies and the solar system. Emphasis for the model is on gravity as the force that holds together the solar system and Milky Way galaxy and controls orbital motions within them. Examples of models can be physical (such as the analogy of distance along a football field or computer visualizations of elliptical orbits) or conceptual (such as mathematical proportions relative to the size of familiar objects such as students’ school or state). Assessment does not include Kepler’s Laws of orbital motion or the apparent retrograde motion of the planets as viewed from Earth.
Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and explain how it is conveyed in the text.
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings.
Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples or anecdotes).
Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.

Reviews

Questions & Answers

Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials.

More About Us

Keep in Touch!

Sign Up