Greek Mythology - The Origin of Death PPT

Greek Mythology - The Origin of Death PPT
Greek Mythology - The Origin of Death PPT
Greek Mythology - The Origin of Death PPT
Greek Mythology - The Origin of Death PPT
Greek Mythology - The Origin of Death PPT
Greek Mythology - The Origin of Death PPT
Greek Mythology - The Origin of Death PPT
Greek Mythology - The Origin of Death PPT
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The Origin of Death

Hebrew

While Jewish monotheism rejected the polytheistic concept of a specific deity responsible for death on earth (as was popular, for example, among the Canaanites), remnants of the polytheistic influence is evident in biblical descriptions of God's host of angel servants in general, and of the angel of death in particular. The "Angel of the Lord" who smites human beings is called the destroyer and is described as standing between earth and heaven, with a drawn sword in his hand. This angel, however, is a temporary messenger, and even the verses where death is personified do not point to a permanent angel responsible for terminating life on earth.

In post-biblical times the concept of an Angel of Death as an independent being emerged. The Angel of Death came to be associated with not only those episodes of death, cruelty, and wretchedness described in the Bible — such as the plagues in Egypt — but also with the dreadful ogres and demons which make their way into the oral tradition (as in does into the ancient Near Eastern and medieval European traditions). This Angel of Death is an active supernatural being who acts independently of God's will; he fights, harms and destroys man at his own initiative.

South Africa

The Moon, it is said, sent once an Insect to Men, saying, "Go thou to Men, and tell them, 'As I die, and dying live, so ye shall also die, and dying live.'"

The Insect started with the message, but whilst on his way was overtaken by the Hare, who asked: "On what errand art thou bound? "The Insect answered: "I am sent by the Moon to Men, to tell them that as she dies, and dying lives, they also shall die, and dying live." The Hare said, "As thou art an awkward runner, let me go" (to take the message). With these words he ran off, and when he reached Men, he said, "I am sent by the Moon to tell you, 'As I die, and dying perish, in the same manner ye shall also die and come wholly to an end."

Then the Hare returned to the Moon, and told her what he had said to Men. The Moon reproached him angrily, saying, "Darest thou tell the people a thing which I have not said? With these words she took up a piece of wood, and struck him on the nose. Since that day the Hare's nose is slit.

Native American Legends

A person was dying. Then some people said: "Let it be that he lies outside for three days. Then he will get up and be a person again." Now there was one newly married man, the meadow-lark. He did not like the dead person lying near his house because the body smelled. He said: "We will take the dead one away and burn him." So the people were persuaded. They built a pile of wood, laid the body on it, and burned it. Thus the people of old times did, and so people die now and do not come back.

The Dinka Say that Woman is the Origin of Death

The artist alludes to a well-known story from Dinka mythology. In ancient times, the earth and the sky were so close that they were linked by a single rope; anyone who died could ascend the rope to be reborn. A woman pounding grain killed a bird, causing the bird’s mother to sever the rope in revenge, bringing true death into the world. At the same time, the bird cutting the rope also signifies the enduring hope for peace: in the midst of pain and privation visions of hope and regeneration endure.

African Mythology: Nyambe and the Origin of Death

Nyambe was the creator.

He had a wife, Nasilele, who wanted humans to die forever. But Nyambe wanted them to live again once they had died. Nyambe had a favored dog that, when it died, he wanted to restore to life. But his wife objected because, she said, the dog was a thief. Later, Nasilele's mother died. When she asked her husband to restore her mother to life, he refused, reminding her that she had been opposed to giving new life to his dog. But after a time he relented. As he was bringing the mother to life, Nasilele, because of her curiosity, interfered, and the mother stayed dead. They then discussed the issue of whether eternal life should be given to mankind, and Nyambe sent the chameleon with that message. But the hare arrived on earth first, and told men that once dead they would remain dead.

the Madagascar myth about the origin of death

One day God asked the 1st human couple, who then lived in heaven, what kind of death they wanted--that of the moon or that of the banana. The couple wondered what the difference was, so God explained: The banana puts forth shoots that take its place and the moon itself comes back to life.

The couple considered for a long time before they made their choice. If they chose to be childless, they would avoid death for themselves, but they would also be very lonely and would be forced to do all of the work by themselves and would not have anyone to work and strive for.

So they asked God for children, well aware of the consequences of their choice. And their request was granted.

Since that time, each human has spent only a short time on this earth.

The Origin of Death (Yauelmani Yokuts)

It was Coyote who brought it about that people die. He made it thus because our hands are not closed like his. He wanted our hands to be like his, but kondjodji (a lizard), said to him: 'No, they must have my hand.' He had five fingers and Coyote had only a fist. So now we have an open hand with five fingers. But then Coyote said: 'Well, then they will have to die.'

Maasai - Fables and Legends

The Origin of Death

In the beginning there was no death. This is the story of how death came into the world.

   There was once a man known as Leeyio who was the first man that Naiteru-kop brought to earth. Naiteru-Kop then called Leeyio and said to him: "When a man dies and you dispose of the corpse, you must remember to say, 'man die and come back again, moon die, and remain away'."

Many months elapsed before anyone died. When, in the end, a neighbor's child did die, Leeyio was summoned to dispose of the body. When he took the corpse outside, he made a mistake and said:

   "Moon die and come back again, man die and stay away." So after that no man survived death.

  A few more months elapsed, and Leeyio's own child went missing. So the father took the corpse outside and said: "Moon die and remain away, man die and come back again." On hearing this, Naiteru-kop said to Leeyio: "You are too late now for, through your own mistake, death was born the day when your neighbour's child died." So that is how death came about, and that is why up to this day when a man dies he does not return, but when the moon dies, it always comes back again.

 Many months elapsed before anyone died. When, in the end, a neighbour's child did die, Leeyio was summoned to dispose of the body. When he took the corpse outside, he made a mistake and said:

   "Moon die and come back again, man die and stay away." So after that no man survived death.

   A few more months elapsed, and Leeyio's own child went missing. So the father took the corpse outside and said: "Moon die and remain away, man die and come back again." On hearing this, Naiteru-kop said to Leeyio: "You are too late now for, through your own mistake, death was born the day when your neighbour's child died." So that is how death came about, and that is why up to this day when a man dies he does not return, but when the moon dies, it always comes back again.

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