Whoops! Something went wrong.

Click here to refresh the page

HISTORY JUDGE: Jackson & Trail of Tears Primary Source Analysis

HISTORY JUDGE:  Jackson & Trail of Tears Primary Source Analysis
HISTORY JUDGE:  Jackson & Trail of Tears Primary Source Analysis
HISTORY JUDGE:  Jackson & Trail of Tears Primary Source Analysis
HISTORY JUDGE:  Jackson & Trail of Tears Primary Source Analysis
HISTORY JUDGE:  Jackson & Trail of Tears Primary Source Analysis
HISTORY JUDGE:  Jackson & Trail of Tears Primary Source Analysis
HISTORY JUDGE:  Jackson & Trail of Tears Primary Source Analysis
HISTORY JUDGE:  Jackson & Trail of Tears Primary Source Analysis
Grade Levels
Resource Type
Product Rating
4.0
1 rating
File Type

Compressed Zip File

Be sure that you have an application to open this file type before downloading and/or purchasing.

1 MB|20 pages
Share
Product Description
In this installment of HISTORY JUDGE, students will analyze seven primary and one secondary source on President Andrew Jackson, the Indian Removal Act, and the subsequent "Trail of Tears" that ensued (albeit mostly after his tenure as President ended, but it was his policy that put it in effect, but I digress). Students will source and annotate documents, weigh evidence, think critically about the principles of limited government, then produce a written conclusion based on text evidence.

BACKGROUND:
In 1830, President Andrew Jackson passed the Indian Removal Act through Congress. This act violated numerous other agreements, treaties, understandings, and contracts previously held with various tribes in the US, mostly in the Southern region. Claiming the need for more land, the U.S. Government then forced the relocation of approx 125,000 Natives to unsettled lands west of the Mississippi, the most documented and cruel being the Cherokee nation relocated in present day Oklahoma. The removal of humans off private property, not to mention the conditions of resettlement, are some of the darkest and most shameful memories in US History. Your students will evaluate the sources and analyze the information shared in order to JUDGE our government-- was this within Presidential power or an abuse of power by Jackson and his government?


This bundle includes--
1. Packet Version 1-- Sources (7 total) with focus questions-- for students who need more help focusing on primary source documents.
2. Packet Version 2 -- Sources (8 total) with "Field Notebook", giving students room for their own personal annotations of the document. The one additional source on this version has a higher lexile, and my TAG group prefers to make their own annotations.
3. Simple ppt to guide class through this activity. (Visual instructions, provides stability and pacing).


Author's Note: I know this is a sensitive topic to many students, perhaps more in certain areas of the US than others. By posing this topic as a question, I am encouraging students to think through both sides of an issue. No one is arguing that the Trail of Tears wasn't a horrific experience. In fact, three sources bring to light human rights violations and other such cruelties that took place on the Trail of Tears. But, alongside these arguments, students will be challenged to also consider Constitutional rights and limitations of the Presidency as well as limitations of the Legislative branch. Three documents actually help make Jackson's case for his decision, attempting to allow students to see the Indian Removal Act from his perspective. Granted, students might not think his perspective is valid, but it is there for their review either way. This is what makes history interesting!! Also, the presence of both perspectives is what makes this resource different from other resources on TpT-- Jackson is not vilified, per se. Still, though, students will be forced to consider more than one perspective when evaluating, or judging, history.



******************************************************************
Follow me on Instagram @HistoricalThinkingClassroom

Check out these other products:
Women in Civil War: Station Rotation study of Mary Ann Shadd Cary
Women in Civil War: Close Read of Mary Ann Shadd Cary
Student Letters to their Senator- Writing Project
History Detective: Who Killed President Zachary Taylor?
History Detective: Who Killed Meriwether Lewis?
******************************************************************

Customer Tips:

How to get TPT credit to use on future purchases:
• Please go to your My Purchases page (you may need to login). Beside each purchase you'll see a Provide Feedback button. Simply click it and you will be taken to a page where you can give a quick rating and leave a short comment for the product. Each time you give feedback, TPT gives you credits that you use to lower the cost of your future purchases. I value your feedback greatly as it helps me determine which products are most valuable for your classroom so I can create more for you. ☺

Be the first to know about my new discounts, freebies and product launches:
• Look for the green star next to my store logo and click it to become a follower. Voila! You will now receive email updates about this store. ☺


Thanks!

Total Pages
20 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
2 days
Report this Resource
Loading...
$3.99
Digital Download
More products from Historical Thinking Classroom
Product Thumbnail
Product Thumbnail
Product Thumbnail
Product Thumbnail
Product Thumbnail
$3.99
Digital Download
Teachers Pay Teachers

Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials.

Learn More

Keep in Touch!

Sign up