Halloween Halves: Find the Whole

Halloween Halves: Find the Whole
Halloween Halves: Find the Whole
Halloween Halves: Find the Whole
Halloween Halves: Find the Whole
Halloween Halves: Find the Whole
Halloween Halves: Find the Whole
Halloween Halves: Find the Whole
Halloween Halves: Find the Whole
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Halloween means a lot of candy! Take this opportunity to teach your students about fun, real-world reasons to learn about halves.

Students will cut out the halves of candy, find matching equal-sized parts, and paste the wholes together.

This activity shows students the importance of equal-sized parts and wholes in fractions. Half of a Twizzler is not the same as half of a Sour Patch Kid!

This version has Halloween-themed clip art and candy corns to bring a festive spirit to your math lesson on Halloween. Check out the "Halves: Find the Whole" resource to use this worksheet on any day.

Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and-if there is a flaw in an argument-explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.
Partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole. For example, partition a shape into 4 parts with equal area, and describe the area of each part as 1/4 of the area of the shape.
Partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc., and describe the whole as two halves, three thirds, four fourths. Recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape.
Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, fourths, and quarters, and use the phrases half of, fourth of, and quarter of. Describe the whole as two of, or four of the shares. Understand for these examples that decomposing into more equal shares creates smaller shares.
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