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Halloween Math Worksheet | Halloween Activities FREE

Grade Levels
2nd - 3rd
Standards
Formats Included
  • PDF
Pages
6 pages

Also included in

  1. Use this YEAR LONG BUNDLE of PRINT & GO math enrichment activities to challenge your high flying 2nd and 3rd grade students with advanced math problem solving fun ALL YEAR LONG. A Year of Math Challenges & Brain Teasers includes every math challenge and brain teaser pack in the store and is
    $89.00
    $119.50
    Save $30.50

Description

Add this FREE Halloween math challenge worksheet to your 2nd or 3rd grade math centers, homework, fast finishers, morning work, number talks, small groups, math enrichment contracts, or whole class problem solving plans for October! Just PRINT & GO.

Includes:

  • Math Challenge: Haunted Halloween Party (Place value with 3-digit numbers, adding multiple 1-digit numbers, logical thinking)
  • Lined page for students to write about strategies and mathematical thinking
  • Ideas for using math challenges & brainteasers in your classroom
  • Answer key
  • Thank you & links

Have a fab day Super Teacher,

Katie

iwanttobeasuperteacher.com

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Here are a few ideas for how you might use these challenges and brainteasers in your own classroom:

*Use these as extension activities for math contracts. Make a pack of challenge problems for advanced students to use as a fast finisher or during certain in-class math lessons when they’ve already mastered the material. You can read more about this strategy and receive a free editable math contract at my blog HERE.

*Use a challenge or brainteaser as a homework option for students who need a challenge, or let them replace a simple homework assignment with the challenge to show parents how well you’re differentiating.

*Use a math challenge or brainteaser as a “number talk” problem to start out your daily math class. Work through it as a class or let students work in partners or small groups to talk through it and solve it together.

*Give a challenge or brainteaser to a small group of students as one of their independent math workshop rotations or use them with your advanced small math group rotation.

*Use the problems as an independent practice activity during a unit on problem solving strategies (guess and check, work backwards, etc.) or attacking a multi-step problem.

*Keep a stack of challenge problems in your classroom fast finisher area for any student who wants a challenge.

*Choose one or two challenge problems for the month and reward any student who can solve both. You can put these on a bulletin board or have them available as additional incentives.

*Use the holiday themed challenges as a choice activity during a holiday party or to keep your sanity during that holiday down time.

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Total Pages
6 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
N/A
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Attend to precision. Mathematically proficient students try to communicate precisely to others. They try to use clear definitions in discussion with others and in their own reasoning. They state the meaning of the symbols they choose, including using the equal sign consistently and appropriately. They are careful about specifying units of measure, and labeling axes to clarify the correspondence with quantities in a problem. They calculate accurately and efficiently, express numerical answers with a degree of precision appropriate for the problem context. In the elementary grades, students give carefully formulated explanations to each other. By the time they reach high school they have learned to examine claims and make explicit use of definitions.
Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and-if there is a flaw in an argument-explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.
Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might, depending on the context of the problem, transform algebraic expressions or change the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need. Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw diagrams of important features and relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize and solve a problem. Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different method, and they continually ask themselves, "Does this make sense?" They can understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences between different approaches.
Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.
Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

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