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History Through Music - Censorship & Regulation - Participation in Gov't

Grade Levels
12th
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$6.00
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Description

Hello! This is part of my History Through Music series of units and lessons, designed to use music as a catalyst for discussion, research, writing, and critical thinking about history and civic participation. PLEASE REVIEW - I AM BRAND NEW TO TPT! THANK YOU!

* This set of lessons contains mature material, and is designed for students in Civics or Participation in Government Courses, who are researching and developing their own sense of political and civic identity.

My Thoughts About This Case Study:

I whole-heartedly believe that music has been and will always be the spark and the foundation of controversy, social change, and social justice.

As a teacher and a parent, I seek out music that helps my students and children to develop their own sense of identity and especially their own sense of political identity. I want my students and children to be able to hear music, relate it to their rights and the rights of others, connect to it emotionally, and walk away from it knowing more about themselves and the world. I think this is most likely to happen with modern music (20th-21st centuries). I know, it’s a lofty goal, but maybe sometimes this will happen.

Personal Inspiration for This Case Study:

For “my generation,” I will be brave and share with you some music I used to listen to, still listen to, and the social and political issues that the music brought up in history.

I am hoping that you, as my students, will make your own determination about whether or not this music should have been regulated.

In this set of activities, students will:

* Reflect upon and discuss parental advisory labels on music

* Examine and Analyze a series of documents related to the 1985 Senate hearings on this issue

* Listen to and examine music labeled offensive during the hearings, and develop a personal stance (Twisted Sister, "We're Not Gonna Take It")

* Work in pairs to hold mini-debates using provided documents

* Write a political stance essay citing sources from the unit

NOTE TO TEACHERS:

This Case Study was adapted from teachrock.org, a truly fantastic site run by those who share my belief that music is a link to critically thinking about history. They have numerous lessons, resources, handouts, videos, and documents that are designed to be used and adapted to your classrooms. I happened to adapt this unit because it is more useful to me in this format for teaching. I highly recommend visiting their site and I hope you find my compilation of the materials useful for your own classroom.

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