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Human Population Growth and Climate (KEY)

Biologycorner
852 Followers
Grade Levels
9th - 12th
Subjects
Standards
Resource Type
Formats Included
  • PDF
$2.00
$2.00
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Biologycorner
852 Followers

Description

This activity was designed for home school during the Covid-19 pandemic. Students were completing a unit on ecology and had already done activities on trophic cascades.

In this activity, students explore an interactive map and timeline that showcases major events in human history that impacted human populations, events like plagues or the development of new technology. As they look at how the world changed over time, they answer questions.

The student worksheet is available for free at biologycorner.com as a google doc which can be shared to google classroom. , this download includes the student worksheet and answer key in pdf form.

Total Pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
NGSSHS-ESS3-5
Analyze geoscience data and the results from global climate models to make an evidence-based forecast of the current rate of global or regional climate change and associated future impacts to Earth's systems. Examples of evidence, for both data and climate model outputs, are for climate changes (such as precipitation and temperature) and their associated impacts (such as on sea level, glacial ice volumes, or atmosphere and ocean composition). Assessment is limited to one example of a climate change and its associated impacts.
NGSSHS-ESS3-1
Construct an explanation based on evidence for how the availability of natural resources, occurrence of natural hazards, and changes in climate have influenced human activity. Examples of key natural resources include access to fresh water (such as rivers, lakes, and groundwater), regions of fertile soils such as river deltas, and high concentrations of minerals and fossil fuels. Examples of natural hazards can be from interior processes (such as volcanic eruptions and earthquakes), surface processes (such as tsunamis, mass wasting and soil erosion), and severe weather (such as hurricanes, floods, and droughts). Examples of the results of changes in climate that can affect populations or drive mass migrations include changes to sea level, regional patterns of temperature and precipitation, and the types of crops and livestock that can be raised.

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