Easel by TpT

I Have, Who Has Addition 0-20 Math Game

Grade Levels
K - 3rd, Homeschool
Standards
Formats Included
  • PDF
Pages
10 pages
$3.00
$3.00
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Description

I Have...Who Has (Superheroes) is a must have math game for kindergarten, first grade, and second grade. Addition to 20 is a great game to review and build math fluency. Play as a whole group or assign to small groups in math stations.

Students quickly learn the pattern of this game, and get excited to call out their card. "I have _____, Who has____?" They tell the class what number sentence they have at the top of their card, and ask who has the sum to the addition problem at the bottom of their card.

Kids can't argue who goes first, and you don't have to make that decision! A starting card, and ending card are included.

You can see how to play I Have, Who Has HERE

CONTENTS

Directions

23 cards total, including a start and ending card.

Title Card

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Total Pages
10 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies. By end of Grade 2, know from memory all sums of two one-digit numbers.
Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 - 4 = 13 - 3 - 1 = 10 - 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 - 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).
Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).
Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)

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