Introducing Quotations: How to PROPERLY EMBED Evidence (i.e. Set Up Quotes)

Introducing Quotations: How to PROPERLY EMBED Evidence (i.e. Set Up Quotes)
Introducing Quotations: How to PROPERLY EMBED Evidence (i.e. Set Up Quotes)
Introducing Quotations: How to PROPERLY EMBED Evidence (i.e. Set Up Quotes)
Introducing Quotations: How to PROPERLY EMBED Evidence (i.e. Set Up Quotes)
Introducing Quotations: How to PROPERLY EMBED Evidence (i.e. Set Up Quotes)
Introducing Quotations: How to PROPERLY EMBED Evidence (i.e. Set Up Quotes)
Standards
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This handout provides a thorough and clear explanation of how to properly embed quotations within a paper. The handout will introduce students to the three methods they should be using to introduce textual evidence. It offers a lucid account of how to properly punctuate quotations, how to properly alter quotations, and how to properly cite evidence from different literary genres (novel, plays, poems, etc).

Tired of reading papers in which students repeat the exact same phrases to introduce a series of quotations? Tired of reading papers in which students contextualize evidence by writing, On page 34, it says, "blah blah" ?? Look no further! I developed this resource after listening to my talented English colleagues chat about their shared frustrations over how students frame quotations in their papers. If the teachers at your school are facing similar frustrations, then you might find this handout to be helpful.

As it turns out, there are only three strategies that writers employ when embedding quotations in a paper. This handout explains when and how students should use each of the three strategies:

1. Block Quotations: The best technique for framing a long quotation is to use a block quotation. The examples in this handout will model not only how to punctuate a block quotation but also how to follow up with analysis by picking out key words from the quotation and unpacking their significance.

2. Clause-and-Colon Method: The best technique for framing a mid-sized quotation is to introduce the quotation with an independent clause followed by a colon (:). The examples in this handout will model the grammatically correct way to use a colon to set up a quotation.

3. Integration-of-Keywords Method: The best technique for framing shorter quotations is to integrate the quotations into the writer's own sentences. The examples in this handout demonstrate how to integrate quotations seamlessly into the flow of one's sentences.

Here's my suggestion for how to use this handout. What I'd recommend is that you distribute this handout to your students before you distribute your next writing assignment. After reading and discussing each of the three methods, you might announce that all students will be required to utilize both the "clause-and-colon method" and the "integration-of-keywords method" at least once in their next papers. Should you do that, I promise their papers will improve!

My store is called “Rigorous Resources” because all of the materials prioritize rigorous content over decorative graphics. While there are plenty of sellers whose lessons feature beautiful design elements, my resources promise to improve students' writing by equipping them with practical skills used by published academic writers.

The previews for my resources provide direct access to several pages of exemplary materials. Hit the green “Preview” button to see exactly what you’ll get. . . .

These materials will come to you in a single 3-page PDF. Should you wish to edit the materials, just email me after purchasing and I’ll send you everything in an editable Word document. Oh, and I hope you'll consider leaving some positive feedback — I would really appreciate your support!

Thank you for choosing “Rigorous Resources”!!

Happy teaching!

Adam Jernigan, Ph.D.

adamjernigan@gmail.com

Store: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Rigorous-Resources

Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.
Acquire and use accurately a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when encountering an unknown term important to comprehension or expression.
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
Total Pages
3 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
30 minutes
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