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Introductions are like Free Samples (DISTANCE LEARNING): Lesson for ANY Essay!

Secondary Sara
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Grade Levels
6th - 10th
Standards
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Pages
2+ pages
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Secondary Sara
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Description

Now includes Google, PDF, *and* Office versions! Introduction paragraphs are like free samples of food – it’s your one chance to grab a customer (reader) and convince them to “buy in” and keep reading.

This lesson teaches students that it’s important to not just have a great hook, but make the entire paragraph clear and compelling so that readers get an accurate, engaging preview of what will be discussed.

This lesson (PDF, Google Slides, and editable PPT files), applicable for argumentative OR informative essays, was designed as an introduction (ha!) for students who have not been taught this content before, BUT it also serves as a great review lesson for older students, or for any learner who just needs to hear something multiple times.

This lesson includes an introduction, two mentor text paragraphs, a “recipe” checklist for good introductions, some words of caution, and then an immediate formative assessment opportunity.

Use this lesson to collect formative data in two ways. First, students attempt to write their own introductions for you to assess; then, an exit ticket asks students to summarize what they have learned to see what stuck out to them and whether or not they “got it”.

NOTE: This product is INCLUDED in my Five Paragraph Essay BUNDLE and is also featured in my Essay Mega Bundle! Check them out to save big!

Check out the other lessons in the series!

• FREE: Conclusions are like Dessert

Thesis Statements are like Menus

Body Paragraphs are like Courses

Transitions are like Waiters

Evidence is like Seasoning

Proofreading is like Checking your Teeth

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You might also like…

My other writing materials:

• "Short Research Projects" original Volume I Bundle

"Short Research Projects" Volume II Bundle

Intro to Debate Unit

"Why Grammar?" essay project

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Total Pages
2+ pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
45 minutes
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
Introduce claim(s), acknowledge and distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically.
Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

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