Julius Caesar eNotes Lesson Plan

Julius Caesar eNotes Lesson Plan
Julius Caesar eNotes Lesson Plan
Julius Caesar eNotes Lesson Plan
Julius Caesar eNotes Lesson Plan
Julius Caesar eNotes Lesson Plan
Julius Caesar eNotes Lesson Plan
Julius Caesar eNotes Lesson Plan
Julius Caesar eNotes Lesson Plan
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This 66-page lesson plan for Julius Caesar was written, tested, and approved by working classroom teachers. The main components of this plan are the following:

-An in-depth introductory lecture
-Discussion questions
-Vocabulary lists
-Chapter-by-chapter study questions
-A multiple-choice test
-Essay questions

This lesson plan proceeds through each act, giving students important vocabulary items to study, as well as reading comprehension and discussion questions. The plan is divided into a teacher and a student edition. The teacher edition provides complete answer keys.

Excerpt from introductory lecture:

Julius Caesar, one of Shakespeare’s best-known tragedies, is based on the assassination of Julius Caesar, the historical event occurring on the ides of March (March 15) in 44 BCE. While the plot of the play centers on the assassination and its aftermath, the story focuses on Brutus, a Roman senator and Caesar’s friend who joins the conspiracy to kill Caesar only after much deliberation. Brutus’s feelings about murdering Caesar serve as the central conflict in the play; a man of honor, Brutus weighs his love of freedom and of Rome itself against his personal loyalty to a friend. In Shakespeare’s drama, Brutus ultimately is manipulated into joining the conspiracy and participates in stabbing Caesar to death on the floor of the Roman Senate. Julius Caesar, however, does not end with the assassination. In the wake of Caesar’s shocking and brutal murder, events unfold quickly in Rome, and later on the plains of Greece, as leaders and armies fight for political power and Brutus faces the tragic consequences of his actions.

Political intrigue, scheming, and rhetorical speech (the art of persuasion) dominate the drama, too, and are as relevant to politics today as they were in both Caesar’s and Shakespeare’s time. In its characters, deeply human and often flawed, and in its conflicts and themes, Julius Caesar continues to appeal to a universal audience.

Total Pages
66 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
N/A
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