Kingdom of Kush Sensory Figure Body Biographies - Google Classroom™

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  1. Perfect for distance learning, these print and digital sensory figures, also known as body biographies, are great for characterization or biography projects and helping students analyze people or characters from multiple angles. Choose to use the traditional printable versions or the paperless digit
    Price $14.40Original Price $36.00Save $21.60

Description

Perfect for distance learning, these print and digital sensory figures, also known as body biographies, are great for characterization or biography projects and helping students analyze people or characters from multiple angles. Choose to use the traditional printable version or the paperless digital Google Slides™ version. Read more about how sensory figures can enhance your lessons below!

The figures can be printed in either black and white or colored versions. This set of six sensory figures from the Kingdom of Kush includes both individuals and representatives of groups of people:

1. King Ezana

2. Man

3. Merchant

4. Piankhi

5. Queen Shanakdakheto

6. Woman

*Download a free example sensory figure here!*

Theodore Roosevelt Sensory Figure Example

A sensory figure is a drawing of a historical, living, or fictional figure with first-person descriptions of what they might have thought, seen, heard, touched, said, felt, or otherwise experienced during their lifetime. Students “show what they know” about the figure by writing 1-2 sentence descriptions for their figure’s thoughts, feelings, and actions. After writing the descriptions, students connect them to the part of the body to which it most closely relates. For example, a feeling might be connected to the heart. The descriptions should be specific to the historical figure’s life, not generic statements that could apply to anyone. Students should be encouraged to address several topics in their descriptions instead of repeating information.

Sensory figures are perfect for:

  • using for interactive notebooks
  • engaging students to organize information and demonstrate knowledge for research or assessments
  • allowing students to have a deeper, more empathetic understanding of the figure's experiences
  • adapting to meet a variety of student needs
  • reinforcing vocabulary
  • sharing with partners or doing a gallery walk to see classmates' work

You may also be interested in other sensory figures:

Ancient China Sensory Figures

Ancient Egypt Sensory Figures

Ancient Greece Sensory Figures

Ancient India Sensory Figures

Ancient Rome Sensory Figures

Mesopotamia Sensory Figures FREE

Early Hebrews Sensory Figures

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Total Pages
13 pages
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