LEARNING NAMES THROUGH SINGING GAMES SHEET MUSIC COLLECTION

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Remembering names can be tough. The task is big if you're a classroom teacher, and bigger again for music teachers!

Learning names through Singing Games is the perfect way to make learning names easier and fun! With these songs, the lesson can begin AND you can continue learning student's names. Knowing all your students names is a big help when it comes to behaviour management.

This is a set of 12 Traditional Songs and 2 Original Songs.

Analysis is included at the end of each song.

These resources and more also available on MySongFile.com.au

BEE BEE BUMBLE BEE
- Singing ‘Bee Bee Bumble Bee’ is a great way to learn students' names.
- I use a bumble bee puppet to ‘land’ on students' heads. Selected students respond by singing their name.
- The melodic element ‘la’ can be taught with this song.
- The rhythmic elements ‘ta’ and ‘ti-ti’ can be prepared and practised with this song.

CLAP ME YOUR NAME
- ‘Clap Me Your Name’ is a simple song designed to practise clapping syllables in preparation for teaching rhythm.
- Three verses are included as examples of how to fit names with different numbers of syllables in the song. Insert the names of your students.
- I generally use this song after I have done some clapping of names with students in other lessons.

COME ON EVERYONE
- You can replace the word ‘everyone’ with children's names. Can also substitute other actions for ‘clap’.
- Good song for reinforcing beat.
- The rhythmic element 'too' (minim/half note) can be taught with this song.

COOKIE JAR
- This rhyme is a fun way to learn names of the students in your classes.
- You can also practise beat with this rhyme.

DINAH
- ‘Dinah’ is a great song for teaching the melodic element ‘so’.
- The rhythmic element ‘tika-tika’ can be taught with this song,
- To use this song for word improvisation and learning names, substitute ‘Dinah’ for the name of one of the children in your class. That child then sings a different instrument to replace ‘banjo’.

DOGGIE DOGGIE
- ‘Doggie Doggie’ is a great game to play to give students the opportunity to sing individually in a non-threatening environment.
- You can use ‘Doggie Doggie’ to prepare and practice the rhythmic elements ‘ta’ and ‘ti-ti’ and the melodic element ‘la’.
- You can learn the names of the children in your classes as the child in the middle calls out the name of the one who 'stole the bone'.

DUMPLINS
- This traditional Caribbean song can be used to learn names!
- Written in do pentatonic scale, this song is great for teaching the melodic element 're'.
- This song is also terrific for preparing and practising the rhythmic element 'syncopa'.

HELLO! HOW ARE YOU?
- The song 'Hello! How Are You?' has lyrics added to a short 6 part Classical canon composed by Johann Staden (1579-1634).
- In this version, the original song has been transformed from harmonic minor to Major.
- This song can be used to learn names. Students can sing their name at the end of the song to so-mi or make up a melody of their own.
- The rhythmic element 'tum-ti' can be taught with this song.

KANGAROO
- Children love this circle game.
- At the end where the ‘hunter’ sings the last line, they can either sing or try to disguise their speaking voice.
- If speaking, this is great practise for swapping between singing and speaking voices.
- If singing it's a great way to check individual in-tune singing.
- You can learn the names of the children in your classes as the ‘kangaroo’ in the middle calls out the name of the one who is the ‘hunter’.

LILY LILY WALLFLOWERS
- With ‘Lily, Lily Wallflowers’ you might like to have your students substitute their own words and actions in place of ‘hop’, ‘skip’ and ‘jump’.
- This song can be used to prepare and practise the melodic element ‘la’.
- Use this song to learn the names of students in your class by substituting individual student names for ‘Lily’.
- The beginning of this song can be used to prepare and practise ‘ta’, ‘ti-ti’ and ‘sa’.

MAMA DON’T ‘LOW
- Turn this favourite folk song into a way of learning students' names by following the instructions for the suggested game!
- The melodic element 'ma' (flattened 'mi') can be prepared and practised with this song.
- The rhythmic element 'tika-ti' can also be prepared and practised with this song.

ONE, TWO, THREE, FOUR
- ‘One, Two, Three, Four’ is a great rhyme for practising counting with very young children.
- When you substitute your students' names, this rhyme can be used to learn names!
- The rhythms ‘ta’ and ‘ti-ti’ can be taught with this rhyme.

TELEPHONE SONG
- A call and response song.
- A great way to learn the names of students in your classes!
- This song encourages individual singing.
- A great song for preparing the melodic element 'ta' (flattened 'ti').
- Students enjoy the 'groovy' melody and rhythm.

WHO’S THAT TAPPING AT THE WINDOW
- A useful singing game to play when a new student comes to class to help them learn other students' names.
- A great song for teaching the rhythmic element 'tika tika'.
Total Pages
14
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A

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LEARNING NAMES THROUGH SINGING GAMES SHEET MUSIC COLLECTION
LEARNING NAMES THROUGH SINGING GAMES SHEET MUSIC COLLECTION
LEARNING NAMES THROUGH SINGING GAMES SHEET MUSIC COLLECTION
LEARNING NAMES THROUGH SINGING GAMES SHEET MUSIC COLLECTION