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Least Common Denominators Wheel - Finding LCD Using the Ladder Method

Grade Levels
4th - 6th, Homeschool
Subjects
Standards
Formats Included
  • Zip
Pages
student wheel and key; blank wheel; notes sheet, practice sheet
$2.25
$2.25
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Description

Engaging way to take notes about finding the Least Common Denominator!

You can use this LCD Wheel to introduce how to find least common denominator using the ladder method.

Students can then keep their wheels in their interactive notebooks all year, as a reference/study tool.

The wheel breaks down the steps of the ladder method, and then includes the step for finding the equivalent fractions that would be needed to compare, add, or subtract fractions.

The sections of the wheel include:

1) Write denominators in the ladder

2) Divide by common factors

3) Multiply the numbers outside the ladder

4) Find equivalent fractions

5) Example

Features of this easy-to-use resource:

  • Notes sections and examples
  • Guided practice or individual practice: 8 pair of numbers, to find LCD
  • Coloring/doodling opportunity: students can color the background pattern, as well as the headings and doodle arrows
  • Key and sample with notes and examples in each wheel section
  • PPT file that's a blank wheel with background, so you can add text to make your own math wheels, if you’d like (for classroom use only - not commercial use)

Also included:

1) A separate notes pages that breaks down the steps, for teacher or student reference.

2) A fraction addition and subtraction practice page.

Check out more Math Wheels.

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6th Grade Math Resource Bundle - resources for the entire year.

Common Core Daily Math Warm Ups for Grade 6

Problem Solving Activity Book

Total Pages
student wheel and key; blank wheel; notes sheet, practice sheet
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
N/A
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Look for and make use of structure. Mathematically proficient students look closely to discern a pattern or structure. Young students, for example, might notice that three and seven more is the same amount as seven and three more, or they may sort a collection of shapes according to how many sides the shapes have. Later, students will see 7 × 8 equals the well remembered 7 × 5 + 7 × 3, in preparation for learning about the distributive property. In the expression 𝑥² + 9𝑥 + 14, older students can see the 14 as 2 × 7 and the 9 as 2 + 7. They recognize the significance of an existing line in a geometric figure and can use the strategy of drawing an auxiliary line for solving problems. They also can step back for an overview and shift perspective. They can see complicated things, such as some algebraic expressions, as single objects or as being composed of several objects. For example, they can see 5 – 3(𝑥 – 𝑦)² as 5 minus a positive number times a square and use that to realize that its value cannot be more than 5 for any real numbers 𝑥 and 𝑦.
Reason abstractly and quantitatively. Mathematically proficient students make sense of quantities and their relationships in problem situations. They bring two complementary abilities to bear on problems involving quantitative relationships: the ability to decontextualize-to abstract a given situation and represent it symbolically and manipulate the representing symbols as if they have a life of their own, without necessarily attending to their referents-and the ability to contextualize, to pause as needed during the manipulation process in order to probe into the referents for the symbols involved. Quantitative reasoning entails habits of creating a coherent representation of the problem at hand; considering the units involved; attending to the meaning of quantities, not just how to compute them; and knowing and flexibly using different properties of operations and objects.
Compare two fractions with different numerators and different denominators, e.g., by creating common denominators or numerators, or by comparing to a benchmark fraction such as 1/2. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.

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