Math Bundle - 3rd Grade

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    • Bundle Description
    • Standards

    This Bundle includes several of my VERY popular math products!

    Here are the products you will find in this 3rd Grade Math Bundle:

    1. A YEAR OF GUIDED MATH LESSON PLANS for 3RD GRADE!

    Over 770 Pages of Lesson Plans, Anecdotal Records Sheets, Vocabulary Pages and Graphic Organizers!

    This product includes 30 weeks (CCSS) and 40 weeks (TEKS) of Guided Math Lesson Plans for the teacher and activities for the students!

    25 CCSS Aligned and 46 TEKS Aligned Skills are broken down into 1-week segments (4 days each week with the 5th day being used as a “getting caught up day”) of lessons equaling 30 weeks (CCSS) and 40 weeks (TEKS)!

    WITHIN EACH LESSON:

    • CCSS Skills (Or TEKS Skills) Binder Divider Page

    • A Completed Lesson Plan For Each Day (Day 1-2 and Day 3-4)

    • A Vocabulary Activity (based on the specific CCSS and TEKS that week) to begin your small group lesson

    • Small Group Activity (based on the specific CCSS and TEKS that week)

    • Anecdotal Record Form to fill out on students.

    THESE ARE GREAT PRINT AND GO LESSONS AND RESOURCES TO PUT IN A BINDER!

    Skills Included:

    CCSS

    3.0A.1 - Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each.

    3.0A.2 - Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each.

    3.0A.3 - Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

    3.0A.4 - Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers.

    3.0A.5 - Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide.

    3.0A.6 - Understand division as an unknown-factor problem.

    3.0A.7 - Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers.

    3.0A.8 - Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.

    3.0A.9 - Identify arithmetic patterns (including patterns in the addition table or multiplication table), and explain them using properties of operations.

    3.NBT.1 - Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100.

    3.NBT.2 - Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.

    3.NBT.3 - Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (e.g., 9 × 80, 5 × 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.

    3.NF.1 - Understand a fraction 1/b as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction a/b as the quantity formed by a parts of size 1/b.

    3.NF.2 - Understand a fraction as a number on the number line; represent fractions on a number line diagram.

    3.NF.3 - Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about their size.

    3.MD.1 - Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes, e.g., by representing the problem on a number line diagram.

    3.MD.2 - Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.

    3.MD.3 - Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories. Solve one- and two-step "how many more" and "how many less" problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs.

    3.MD.4 - Generate measurement data by measuring lengths using rulers marked with halves and fourths of an inch. Show the data by making a line plot, where the horizontal scale is marked off in appropriate units— whole numbers, halves, or quarters.

    3.MD.5 - Recognize area as an attribute of plane figures and understand concepts of area measurement.

    3.MD.6 - Measure areas by counting unit squares (square cm, square m, square in, square ft, and improvised units).

    3.MD.7 - Relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition.

    3.MD.8 - Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters.

    3.G.1 - Understand that shapes in different categories (e.g., rhombuses, rectangles, and others) may share attributes (e.g., having four sides), and that the shared attributes can define a larger category (e.g., quadrilaterals). Recognize rhombuses, rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals, and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not belong to any of these subcategories.

    3.G.2 - Partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole.

    TEKS

    3.2 A - The student is expected to compose and decompose numbers up to 100,000 as a sum of so many ten thousands, so many thousands, so many hundreds, so many tens, and so many ones using objects, pictorial models, and numbers, including expanded notation as appropriate.

    3.2 B - The student is expected to describe the mathematical relationships found in the base-10 place value system through the hundred thousands place.

    3.2 C - The student is expected to represent a number on a number line as being between two consecutive multiples of 10; 100; 1,000; or 10,000 and use words to describe relative size of numbers in order to round whole numbers.

    3.2 D - The student is expected to compare and order whole numbers up to 100,000 and represent comparisons using the symbols >, <, or =.

    3.3 A - The student is expected to represent fractions greater than zero and less than or equal to one with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 using concrete objects and pictorial models, including strip diagrams and number lines.

    3.3 B - The student is expected to determine the corresponding fraction greater than zero and less than or equal to one with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 given a specified point on a number line.

    3.3 C - The student is expected to explain that the unit fraction 1/b represents the quantity formed by one part of a whole that has been partitioned into b equal parts where b is a non-zero whole number.

    3.3 D - The student is expected to compose and decompose a fraction a/b with a numerator greater than zero and less than or equal to b as a sum of parts 1/b.

    3.3 E - The student is expected to solve problems involving partitioning an object or a set of objects among two or more recipients using pictorial representations of fractions with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8.

    3.3 F - The student is expected to represent equivalent fractions with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 using a variety of objects and pictorial models, including number lines.

    3.3 G - The student is expected to explain that two fractions are equivalent if and only if they are both represented by the same point on the number line or represent the same portion of a same size whole for an area model.

    3.3 H - The student is expected to compare two fractions having the same numerator or denominator in problems by reasoning about their sizes and justifying the conclusion using symbols, words, objects, and pictorial models.

    3.4 A - The student is expected to solve with fluency one-step and two-step problems involving addition and subtraction within 1,000 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and the relationship between addition and subtraction

    3.4 B -The student is expected to round to the nearest 10 or 100 or use compatible numbers to estimate solutions to addition and subtraction problems.

    3.4 C - The student is expected to determine the value of a collection of coins and bills.

    3.4 D - The student is expected to determine the total number of objects when equally-sized groups of objects are combined or arranged in arrays up to 10 by 10.

    3.4 E - The student is expected to represent multiplication facts by using a variety of approaches such as repeated addition, equal-sized groups, arrays, area models, equal jumps on a number line, and skip counting.

    3.4 F - The student is expected to recall facts to multiply up to 10 by 10 with automaticity and recall the corresponding division facts.

    3.4 G - The student is expected to use strategies and algorithms, including the standard algorithm, to multiply a two-digit number by a one-digit number. Strategies may include mental math, partial products, and the commutative, associative, and distributive properties.

    3.4 H - The student is expected to determine the number of objects in each group when a set of objects is partitioned into equal shares or a set of objects is shared equally.

    3.4 I - The student is expected to determine if a number is even or odd using divisibility rules.

    3.4 J - The student is expected to determine a quotient using the relationship between multiplication and division.

    3.4 K - The student is expected to solve one-step and two-step problems involving multiplication and division within 100 using strategies based on objects; pictorial models, including arrays, area models, and equal groups; properties of operations; or recall of facts.

    3.5 A - The student is expected to represent one- and two-step problems involving addition and subtraction of whole numbers to 1,000 using pictorial models, number lines, and equations.

    3.5 B - The student is expected to represent and solve one- and two-step multiplication and division problems within 100 using arrays, strip diagrams, and equations.

    3.5 C - The student is expected to describe a multiplication expression as a comparison such as 3 x 24 represents 3 times as much as 24.

    3.5 D - The student is expected to determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers when the unknown is either a missing factor or product.

    3.5 E - The student is expected to represent real-world relationships using number pairs in a table and verbal descriptions.

    3.6 A - The student is expected to classify and sort two- and three-dimensional figures, including cones, cylinders, spheres, triangular and rectangular prisms, and cubes, based on attributes using formal geometric language.

    3.6 B - The student is expected to use attributes to recognize rhombuses, parallelograms, trapezoids, rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not belong to any of these subcategories.

    3.6 C - The student is expected to determine the area of rectangles with whole number side lengths in problems using multiplication related to the number of rows times the number of unit squares in each row.

    3.6 D - The student is expected to decompose composite figures formed by rectangles into non-overlapping rectangles to determine the area of the original figure using the additive property of area.

    3.6 E - The student is expected to decompose two congruent two-dimensional figures into parts with equal areas and express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole and recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape.

    3.7 A - The student is expected to represent fractions of halves, fourths, and eighths as distances from zero on a number line.

    3.7 B - The student is expected to determine the perimeter of a polygon or a missing length when given perimeter and remaining side lengths in problems.

    3.7 C - The student is expected to determine the solutions to problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes using pictorial models or tools such as a 15-minute event plus a 30-minute event equals 45 minutes.

    3.7 D - The student is expected to determine when it is appropriate to use measurements of liquid volume (capacity) or weight.

    3.7 E - The student is expected to determine liquid volume (capacity) or weight using appropriate units and tools.

    3.8 A - The student is expected to summarize a data set with multiple categories using a frequency table, dot plot, pictograph, or bar graph with scaled intervals.

    3.8 B - The student is expected to solve one- and two-step problems using categorical data represented with a frequency table, dot plot, pictograph, or bar graph with scaled intervals.

    3.9 A - The student is expected to explain the connection between human capital/labor and income.

    3.9 B - The student is expected to describe the relationship between the availability or scarcity of resources and how that impacts cost.

    3.9 C - The student is expected to identify the costs and benefits of planned and unplanned spending decisions.

    3.9 D - The student is expected to explain that credit is used when wants or needs exceed the ability to pay and that it is the borrower's responsibility to pay it back to the lender, usually with interest.

    3.9 E - The student is expected to list reasons to save and explain the benefit of a savings plan, including for college.

    3.9 F - The student is expected to identify decisions involving income, spending, saving, credit, and charitable giving.

    THIS ITEM IS A MUST HAVE!

    I have been teaching for 12 years. These are skill based lesson plans, with instructions for the teacher and fun, interactive yet challenging activities for the student!

    If you still have questions, message me or e-mail me at masonk23@hotmail.com!

    2. Emergency Sub Plans! (Math 3rd Grade)

    Have you ever been in a pickle and had to call in sick at the last minute? I have known teachers that will have to go to the school sick just to write sub plans and go back home! Do not do this to yourself! These are DONE! 10 days of Math Sub Plans, ready to print, stack, and leave! Here is how they work!

    Each day of sub plans includes the following items…and there are 10 days of these sub plans!

    Morning Work with Answer Key- A 20-30 minute activity (mystery number) to get the kids working, brain warming up, and allowing the sub a moment to breathe and figure things out.

    Word of the Day - Two Math Vocabulary Words each day covering concepts that will be the focus of the days activities. Students will look the word up, write a definition, explain how they see this word being used in every day life, write a word problem using this vocabulary word, and finally draw a picture that goes with the word.

    Math Story Problems - A writing prompt with a teacher letter attached explaining what he or she wants the students to do with these math story problems. It includes numbers to use in their story problem and the topic that needs to be used.

    Math Work with Answer Key - Math problems the student will work on independently. This activity will take approximately 30 minutes to complete.

    Fast Finisher Task Card- This task card has 6 activities for the students to do when they are finished. The students just roll a die and the number picks the activity they will complete. (I always make sure I have a student that knows where my dice are in case I do get sick and they need to help the sub find these.)

    And…MOST IMPORTANTLY…

    A lesson plan- this lesson plan is generic enough to fit any day, but specific enough to help the sub know exactly what to do with these activities; just place it on top of the student activities and you are ready. The only thing missing are the “times” because I know everyone’s schedule is different. Just have a schedule for him or her nearby, and then these lesson plan will tell the sub exactly what he or she needs to do, approximate time to spend on the activity, and what activity to move onto next.

    These are arranged in folders:

    Addition

    Area and Perimeter

    Division

    Equations

    Equivalent Fractions

    Estimation and Rounding

    Fractions

    Multiplication

    Place Value

    Subtraction

    Again, there are enough for 10 Days!

    DISCLAIMER: Since these are just Math plans, I have made the lesson plans for departmentalized teachers. Meaning, these lessons will be done with a morning group and an afternoon group. IF YOU ARE NOT DEPARTMENTALIZED…these are still for you! You would have to add Language Arts activities of your own, but half of your day would be COMPLETE!

    I encourage you to buy these, run the copies, and place them in a “sub tub” or “sub drawer.” Then your fellow teachers can go right to it when you are sick, pull them out, and you are done! What a life saver!

    3. Choice Boards: Your 3rd Grade math students will love the challenging and higher level thinking activities they can choose from these choice boards. You can use these for your fast finishers or as math centers. These Choice Boards are a great resource to have in your classroom!

    This resource contains 9 choice boards for your 3rd grade math students. The skills that are included:

    Addition/Subtraction

    Multiplication/Division

    Place Value

    Equations

    Rounding and Estimating

    Data Analysis

    Fractions

    Equivalent Fractions

    Geometry/Measurement

    After you teach a particular skill, grab the Choice Board that goes with that skill and place it on a clipboard. Now they will be ready for the students to use after they finish their work.

    4. Word of the Day Vocabulary Practice (3rd Grade)

    Great vocabulary practice for your 3rd grade students!

    Exposure to strong vocabulary every day is extremely important for students of all ages! These are sure to improve test scores and the over all vocabulary of each student.

    Each piece of paper has two days of words on it. Simply print and cut down the middle. Have each student glue it in a "Math Vocabulary Journal". These are great to use for morning work or for an activity right before you start your math lesson.

    Each Vocabulary Word Practice includes:

    Definition

    Where do you see it (this helps the student identify and make connections of where they might see the particular vocabulary word in their everyday life)

    Word Problem

    Picture

    I hope you find these useful and your kids enjoy them!

    5. Anchor Charts: I love using anchor charts in my classroom! They help students remember concepts throughout the year. The students also love having their journal anchor chart look just like the anchor chart that is on the wall in our classroom.

    Included:

    Area and Perimeter (Student Journal included)

    Fractions (Student Journal included)

    Place Value (Student Journal included)

    Prime and Composite (Student Journal included)

    Volume (Student Journal included)

    2-D Shapes (Student Journal included)

    The process is simple:

    Instructions are included in each purchase. The instructions let you know which color paper to place in the printer to help your anchor charts look amazing!

    6. Flipbooks (Personal Finance Literacy, Estimation, and Place Value):

    This flipbook will help teach Personal Finance Literacy, Estimation, and Place Value in a fun and interactive way. You can partner students up to have them assemble these or you can assemble these for the students!

    Students will find the definition of the vocabulary word and write it down in the space provided, give an example of the word, and draw a picture to illustrate the word.

    DETAILED instructions and assembly pictures are included to help you put together these flipbooks!

    7. Monster Math: This Math Vocabulary is a great activity to help your students practice their math skills! You can use it as a math center, math activity, or review practice.

    Print this activity on cardstock, cut the puzzle pieces out, and laminate it so you can use it over and over again. Have the students match the vocabulary word to the correct definition and example.

    Vocabulary Words Included:

    Addend

    Sum

    Minuend

    Subtrahend

    Difference

    Dividend

    Divisor

    Quotient

    Remainder

    Multiplicand

    Multiplier

    Product

    Partial Product

    Factor

    Enjoy!!

    to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
    Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. Mathematically proficient students notice if calculations are repeated, and look both for general methods and for shortcuts. Upper elementary students might notice when dividing 25 by 11 that they are repeating the same calculations over and over again, and conclude they have a repeating decimal. By paying attention to the calculation of slope as they repeatedly check whether points are on the line through (1, 2) with slope 3, middle school students might abstract the equation (𝑦 – 2)/(𝑥 – 1) = 3. Noticing the regularity in the way terms cancel when expanding (𝑥 – 1)(𝑥 + 1), (𝑥 – 1)(𝑥² + 𝑥 + 1), and (𝑥 – 1)(𝑥³ + 𝑥² + 𝑥 + 1) might lead them to the general formula for the sum of a geometric series. As they work to solve a problem, mathematically proficient students maintain oversight of the process, while attending to the details. They continually evaluate the reasonableness of their intermediate results.
    Look for and make use of structure. Mathematically proficient students look closely to discern a pattern or structure. Young students, for example, might notice that three and seven more is the same amount as seven and three more, or they may sort a collection of shapes according to how many sides the shapes have. Later, students will see 7 × 8 equals the well remembered 7 × 5 + 7 × 3, in preparation for learning about the distributive property. In the expression 𝑥² + 9𝑥 + 14, older students can see the 14 as 2 × 7 and the 9 as 2 + 7. They recognize the significance of an existing line in a geometric figure and can use the strategy of drawing an auxiliary line for solving problems. They also can step back for an overview and shift perspective. They can see complicated things, such as some algebraic expressions, as single objects or as being composed of several objects. For example, they can see 5 – 3(𝑥 – 𝑦)² as 5 minus a positive number times a square and use that to realize that its value cannot be more than 5 for any real numbers 𝑥 and 𝑦.
    Attend to precision. Mathematically proficient students try to communicate precisely to others. They try to use clear definitions in discussion with others and in their own reasoning. They state the meaning of the symbols they choose, including using the equal sign consistently and appropriately. They are careful about specifying units of measure, and labeling axes to clarify the correspondence with quantities in a problem. They calculate accurately and efficiently, express numerical answers with a degree of precision appropriate for the problem context. In the elementary grades, students give carefully formulated explanations to each other. By the time they reach high school they have learned to examine claims and make explicit use of definitions.
    Use appropriate tools strategically. Mathematically proficient students consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem. These tools might include pencil and paper, concrete models, a ruler, a protractor, a calculator, a spreadsheet, a computer algebra system, a statistical package, or dynamic geometry software. Proficient students are sufficiently familiar with tools appropriate for their grade or course to make sound decisions about when each of these tools might be helpful, recognizing both the insight to be gained and their limitations. For example, mathematically proficient high school students analyze graphs of functions and solutions generated using a graphing calculator. They detect possible errors by strategically using estimation and other mathematical knowledge. When making mathematical models, they know that technology can enable them to visualize the results of varying assumptions, explore consequences, and compare predictions with data. Mathematically proficient students at various grade levels are able to identify relevant external mathematical resources, such as digital content located on a website, and use them to pose or solve problems. They are able to use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts.
    Model with mathematics. Mathematically proficient students can apply the mathematics they know to solve problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace. In early grades, this might be as simple as writing an addition equation to describe a situation. In middle grades, a student might apply proportional reasoning to plan a school event or analyze a problem in the community. By high school, a student might use geometry to solve a design problem or use a function to describe how one quantity of interest depends on another. Mathematically proficient students who can apply what they know are comfortable making assumptions and approximations to simplify a complicated situation, realizing that these may need revision later. They are able to identify important quantities in a practical situation and map their relationships using such tools as diagrams, two-way tables, graphs, flowcharts and formulas. They can analyze those relationships mathematically to draw conclusions. They routinely interpret their mathematical results in the context of the situation and reflect on whether the results make sense, possibly improving the model if it has not served its purpose.
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