Math Center Activities for Teaching Place Value Standards K.NBT.1 and 1.NBT.2b

Math Center Activities for Teaching Place Value Standards K.NBT.1 and 1.NBT.2b
Math Center Activities for Teaching Place Value Standards K.NBT.1 and 1.NBT.2b
Math Center Activities for Teaching Place Value Standards K.NBT.1 and 1.NBT.2b
Math Center Activities for Teaching Place Value Standards K.NBT.1 and 1.NBT.2b
Math Center Activities for Teaching Place Value Standards K.NBT.1 and 1.NBT.2b
Math Center Activities for Teaching Place Value Standards K.NBT.1 and 1.NBT.2b
Math Center Activities for Teaching Place Value Standards K.NBT.1 and 1.NBT.2b
Math Center Activities for Teaching Place Value Standards K.NBT.1 and 1.NBT.2b
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6 MB|25 pages
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Students enjoy doing these activities because they get to “feed” pairs of animals. What they learn by doing this is that the numbers from 11 to 19 are made up of 1 ten and some additional ones. This activity is for students who cannot yet immediately answer the following question: “If you have 18 carrots and give 10 carrots to a gray rabbit and the rest to a brown rabbit, how many carrots will the brown rabbit get?”

As an early grade teacher, you know how challenging this very important concept is for young children. Coming to understand that the numbers from 11 to 19 are made up of 1 ten and some more ones is one of the most significant conceptual advances that young children make. As you have probably experienced, young children do not learn this fundamental concept simply by being told that a number such as 14 is made up of 1 ten and 4 ones and that the 1 tells us the number of tens and the 4 tells us the number of ones. In order to learn this concept, students need to be actively engaged in working with sets of objects.

When working on the activities in this product, students “feed” a pair of animals. They start by drawing a number card from 11 to 19 and place that number card in the large red square at the top of the activity page. (Please see the thumbnails.) As an example, if students are working with the rabbits and carrots activity, and if they draw the number 14, they count out 14 carrots. Then they feed the first rabbit ten carrots, filling up the ten frame next to that first rabbit. Then they give the rest of the carrots to the second rabbit. Next, they count the number of carrots that the second rabbit has. Then they chose the single-digit number card that matches that count and place it in the appropriate square in the equation at the top of the page.

There are 9 different animal pairs and related food items in this download. By doing this activity with different animal pairs and with different numbers from 11 to 19, students have repeated experiences of decomposing a number into ten ones and some more ones. They begin to notice that the number of extra ones is the same number as the ending digit in the starting number. This leads to the desired learning. When given the number 15, for example, students will anticipate that the first animal will get 10 items and the second animal will get 5 items. When they know this without having to actually give out the food items, they will have developed this key understanding! Note that students tend to learn this concept for the smaller numbers first, such as 11, 12, or 13.

These activities can be used in math centers or with your whole class—students can work individually or in small groups.

Goals for Students

Common Core State Standards for Mathematics K.NBT.1:
Compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and some further ones, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each composition or decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 18 = 10 + 8); understand that these numbers are composed of ten ones and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

Common Core State Standards for Mathematics 1.NBT.2b:
The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

Contents

Page 1: Title Page
Pages 2-4: Notes for the Teacher
Pages 5-6: Rabbits and carrots
Pages 7-8: Elephants and peanuts
Pages 9-10: Horses and apples
Pages 11-12: Gorilla, monkey, and bananas
Pages 13-14: Squirrel, chipmunk, and acorns
Pages 15-16: Chicken, chick, and kernels of corn
Pages 17-18: Dogs and bones
Pages 19-20: Mice and pieces of cheese
Pages 21-22: Parrots and crackers
Page 23: Array of number cards from 1 to 9
Page 24: Array of number cards from 11 to 19
Page 25: Copyright Page

Enjoy!
Total Pages
25 pages
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