Math Game Comparing Fractions War 3.NF.A.3, 4.NF.A.1, 4.NF.A.2

Math Game Comparing Fractions War 3.NF.A.3, 4.NF.A.1, 4.NF.A.2
Math Game Comparing Fractions War 3.NF.A.3, 4.NF.A.1, 4.NF.A.2
Math Game Comparing Fractions War 3.NF.A.3, 4.NF.A.1, 4.NF.A.2
Math Game Comparing Fractions War 3.NF.A.3, 4.NF.A.1, 4.NF.A.2
Math Game Comparing Fractions War 3.NF.A.3, 4.NF.A.1, 4.NF.A.2
Math Game Comparing Fractions War 3.NF.A.3, 4.NF.A.1, 4.NF.A.2
Grade Levels
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PDF

(2 MB|70 pages)
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Standards
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  • StandardsNEW

Math games are great resources to use to give students more practice in learning math concepts, such as comparing fractions. This resource is in the form of the classic game of War. There are 140 game cards in this set, so the one set can be split into several smaller decks to use with 2-4 students in a group. You can also differentiate based on which cards you put in each deck. There are 70 cards with fraction circle models and 70 cards with fractions in standard form. Struggling students would benefit from having a fraction bar flip chart or fraction circle manipulatives.

To assemble, print pages 4-69 double-sided, cut and laminate, if desired. You can print in grey scale if you want to save on printer ink.

To play the game, students shuffle the deck and divide the cards evenly among themselves. The cards are placed face-down. On each play the student flips the card that is on the top of their deck. The student with the larger/largest fraction wins the hand and collects the cards as points. In the case of equal fractions, a second card is placed on top of the cards and the largest fraction is the winner. At the end of the game, students count their cards. The player with the most cards wins the game.

Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Compare two fractions with different numerators and different denominators, e.g., by creating common denominators or numerators, or by comparing to a benchmark fraction such as 1/2. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.
Explain why a fraction 𝘒/𝘣 is equivalent to a fraction (𝘯 Γ— 𝘒)/(𝘯 Γ— 𝘣) by using visual fraction models, with attention to how the number and size of the parts differ even though the two fractions themselves are the same size. Use this principle to recognize and generate equivalent fractions.
Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about their size.
Total Pages
70 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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