Math Performance Tasks Complete Bundle

Math Performance Tasks Complete Bundle
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This bundle includes ALL seven of my math Performance Tasks

Design a Dream Bedroom, On Stage, Movie Theater Multiplication, The Cupcake Shop, Sleepover Madness, Presidential Statisticians and Recipe Disasters

Design a Dream Bedroom
Students get to step into the shoes of a designer in this open ended performance task. After years of begging student's parents are finally letting them design and remodel their bedroom.

What is in the problem?
There are 6 in-depth problems within this gigantic problem (each step is it's own problem) walking the student through what they need to do. The problems integrate math, reading and writing. It is challenging, open ended, and is a perfect way to practice performance tasks. Everything you need for the problem is included. (I like to pick up actual samples from the hardware store for students to see, but if you can't do that everything is still there in the resource for the entire project.)

Each section is about a full page (or more) of reading to help students practice reading for understanding in math problems. The problems are open ended, meaning that students can come to more than one answer. The problems are deep, multi-step and require perseverance. You will notice that the Standards for Mathematical Practice are embedded within these performance tasks.

What age are the problems appropriate for?
These challenges are appropriate for end of the year 3rd grade (or gifted 3rd graders anytime), 4th grade and possibly for struggling 5th graders.

How can this problem be used?
They could be used as an assessment, test prep, a partner activity, for small group work, as work for students who have finished assignments early or for gifted and talented small groups. Each problem most likely will take more than one class period to complete.

The problem steps and their curricular focus:

1. Blueprint: They draw a blueprint, calculating the dimensions and the area of the bedroom. (geometry, area, perimeter)
2. Furniture: They choose bedroom furniture and add it to the blueprint by drawing the items to scale. (geometry, area, perimeter)
3. Flooring: They calculate the area of the room, choose a type of flooring and calculate the cost. (area, number and operations, multiplication, decimals)
4. Paint: They choose their favorite paint color, and calculate the cost of the paint. (number and operations, multiplication)
5. Textiles: They design the textiles, and add up the cost of purchasing them for the bedroom. (number and operations, multiplication)
6. Accessories: They get to add some cool accessories to their room. (number and operations, multiplication)
7. Letter Writing: In the end, they write a letter to your parents explaining their choices and the final cost of the entire project. (letter writing, organization and ideas, conventions)

A rubric for scoring each of the problems is at the end of the set.

Recipe Disasters

Strengthen your student's skills with benchmark and equivalent fractions with real world problem solving! Students are given a problem page with lots of reading that includes a recipe, and then a problem to solve. This is especially perfect for allowing students to explore the abstract concept of fractions with a real world setting.

Students need to use benchmark fractions (one half, one quarter) and equivalence to successfully make each recipe. The recipes each have a unique problem for the students to figure out:

Included in this resource:

(Each of the 5 recipe comes with a page long sheet to read with the recipe and other information, a page for the student to show their work, and a teacher information/key page.)

1. Anti-Brain Drain Power Bars: Doubling the recipe for your class.
2. Ooey Gooey S'mores: Figuring out how many s'mores a family of five will get with given ingredients.
3. Strawberry Jam Goodness: Converting the recipe when given a small amount of strawberries.
4. Sweet Crunch for the Trail Mix: Making a recipe using only a 1/4 cup to make the recipe.
5. Sweet and Fresh Lemonade: Figuring out whether to half or quarter the recipe.

These problems can be solved without making the recipe, or if you are brave you can give them a spin in the classroom. They are all no bake recipes (except for the s'mores would require a microwave). All of the recipes are kid tested, kid friendly and especially kid tasty!

Common Core State Standard alignment is included. The work is appropriate for students just learning about benchmark fractions of one half and one quarter, as well as for exploring equivalence. The problems are appropriate for 3rd graders, and for 4th graders that might be struggling with these concepts.

Sleepover Madness
Students plan an epic sleepover in this open ended performance task!

What is in the problem?

There are 11 in-depth problems within this gigantic problem (each step is it's own problem) walking the student through what they need to do. The problems integrate math, reading and writing. It is challenging, open ended, and is a perfect way to practice performance tasks. Everything you need for the problem is included, and just needs to be printed.

Each section is a half or full page of reading to help students practice reading for understanding in math problems. The problems are open ended, meaning that students can come to more than one answer. The problems are deep, multi-step and require perseverance. You will notice that the Standards for Mathematical Practice are embedded within these performance tasks.

What age are the problems appropriate for?
These challenges are appropriate for end of the year 3rd grade (or gifted 3rd graders anytime), 4th grade and possibly for struggling 5th graders.

How can this problem be used?
They could be used as an assessment, test prep, a partner activity, for small group work, as work for students who have finished assignments early or for gifted and talented small groups. Each problem most likely will take more than one class period to complete.

The problem steps and their curricular focus:
1. Who is Invited? They put together an invitation list, including addresses of their friends (address writing- a lost letter writing art!)
2. Theme: They choose a theme for the party and explain their creativity (paragraph writing)
3. Invitation: They design the invitation for the party (invitation writing, dates, addresses, phone numbers)
4. Invitation Cost: They choose between two printers who charge differently (money - dollars or euros, number and operations, multiplication, addition)
5. & 6. Food/Breakfast Time: They choose what meals and food they would serve, using quantity. (money - dollars or euros, number and operations, multiplication, addition)
7. Activities: They get to add plan out what activities they'd like to do and calculate the cost. (money - dollars or euros, number and operations, multiplication, addition)
8. Activities Schedule: They plan out the time that everything begins and ends (elapsed time)
9. Where will they sleep? They must determine the area of the rooms of their home where they students will be sleeping, and then draw a blueprint of where all the furniture is, and where the sleeping bags will go. (area, multiplication, measurement-both customary and metric available)
10. Put it all together: They calculate the cost of the entire party (money - dollars or euros, double digit addition)
11. In the end, they write a letter to their parents explaining their choices and the final cost of the entire project. (letter writing, organization and ideas, conventions)

A rubric for scoring each of the problems is at the end of the set. There is not answer key since this is an open ended problem and answers will vary. In addition there is an addendum for the conversion of U.S. dollars to Euros)

On Stage Holiday Program Planning
By some miracle, the student solving this problem has become the music program director! They are charged with planning the entire holiday program for the classroom. They will need to determine the number of tickets needed, what food and drink to serve, how to set up the risers, tables and chairs, and design the invitations and programs.

There are 6 in-depth problems within this gigantic problem (each step is it's own problem) walking the student through what they need to do.
The problems integrate math, reading and writing. It is challenging, open ended, and is a perfect way to practice performance tasks. Everything you need for the problem is included.

Each section is about a full page (or more) of reading to help students practice reading for understanding in math problems. The problems are open ended, meaning that students can come to more than one answer. The problems are deep, multi-step and require perseverance. You will notice that the Standards for Mathematical Practice are embedded within these performance tasks.

These challenges are appropriate for end of the year 3rd grade (or gifted 3rd graders anytime), 4th grade and possibly for struggling 5th graders. They could be used as an assessment, a partner activity, for small group work, as work for students who have finished assignments early or for gifted and talented small groups. Each problem most likely will take more than one class period to complete.

The problem steps and their curricular area of focus:

1. Ticketing: organization and design, number and operations, calculating money, writing (grammar)
2. Invitation Design: measurement measurement, organization and design, critical thinking, applied math
3. Set it Up!: critical thinking, area, multiplication, labeling
4. The Song Line Up: elapsed time, calculating/adding decimal numbers
5. Feed Me!: measurement conversion, calculating money/adding decimal numbers, critical thinking, applied math
6. The Program is the Key: organization and design, writing (grammar)

A rubric for scoring each of the problems is at the end of the set. A checklist is also included (see the preview) to help assess the skills at each level of the problem. All of the problems require reading for understanding as well as writing to explain their thinking. They are challenging and fun!

Presidential Birthday Statisticians
In this math project your student has been commissioned to be a statistician for a very important government official. A special day is coming where our country will be honoring our past (and present) presidents.

The person looking to hire them would like some interesting data, facts and findings about the president’s birthdays and their ages when they took office. They’ll be using the information you present to them in part of a special ceremony that will be televised to the country.

This math project requires collecting data in an organized way from raw data that is given to the student. Students love to analyze birthdays, so why not make it educational with the Presidents of the United States? I use it during the month of February, which typically is the celebration of Presidents' Day.

Everything you'll need is included in this project, except for poster paper at the end. My students use 11 x 17 paper for their poster, but you can use any size you'd like.

Included in this resource:

1. An instruction page to the student.

2. Raw data on the birthdays and ages the U.S. Presidents took office. (As of February 2014)

3. Eleven problems to work through in the process including:
* Determining the ages of past presidents if they were still alive
* Collecting data on birth dates by century
* A pie chart template for inputing the century data
* A table for collecting data on the months that the presidents were born,
* A bar graph template for inputing the month data
* Collecting data on the year each president took office
* 4 questions to find the mean, median, mode and range of the age data
* A guidelines/pre-write sheet for creating the poster at the end.

4. Answer keys for the problems.

Note: Hints are given to help students calculate percentage, mean, median, and mode.

This challenge is appropriate for end of the year 3rd grade (or gifted 3rd graders anytime), 4th grade and possibly for struggling 5th graders. They could be used as an assessment, a partner activity, for small group work, as work for students who have finished assignments early or for gifted and talented small groups.

Movie Theater Multiplication
Students are asked to become builders and designers as they make movie theaters! This is an in-depth look at arrays and the conceptual understanding behind multiplication. This is a perfect project for those students that continually mix up the difference between rows and columns, or if they struggle to understand the meaning behind multiplication number sentences. It is also great fact practice as it starts with facts in the 3s, and gets harder as they go.

This entire project uses the Concrete- Representational-Abstract instructional sequence. As they move along in the project, they move along in the steps. This approach is explained here:

1. When a student is introduced to a new concept or something unfamiliar, you allow the use of tools. (Concrete)

2. When the student can perform the task, they move on to representing the concept with drawings or pictures. (Representational)

3. When the student can master the task with a drawing or a picture they move to using only numbers and symbols. (Abstract)


What is in the problem?

There are 4 stages within this giant problem (each stage has between 4 and 6 tasks in it) walking the student through what they need to do. The 4th stage is open ended and is great for differentiating the project. The problems integrate math, reading and a bit of writing. It is challenging, parts of it are open ended, and is a perfect way to practice performance tasks. Everything you need for the problem is included, and the preview has one of each of the first three stages for you to try. The only thing you will need is a material for the students to actually build the theaters. You could use counters, cubes or any sort of marker that will allow them to work concretely in the first stage.

You will notice that the Standards for Mathematical Practice are embedded within these performance tasks.

What age are the problems appropriate for?

These challenges are appropriate for 2nd graders that may be ready to explore multiplication, 3rd graders who are beginning multiplication, and for struggling 4th graders. I currently use this in my 4th grade intervention group, which is a full year behind their peers.

How can this problem be used?

There are many ways you can use this performance task:

* Fast finisher activity
* Small group work
* Homework for students
* Gifted and talented small groups
* Intervention small groups
* Whole class activity


The problem steps and their curricular focus:

1. Stage 1: In this stage there are five problems in which students are given the parameters for the theaters. For each of the 5 problems they:

* Build concrete models.
* Draw representations of those models.
* Connect to abstract number sentences.

2. Stage 2: In this stage there are four problems in which students assign tickets to the movie goers. For each of the problems they:

* Read drawings and representations.
* Connect to abstract number sentences.


3. Stage 3: There are five problems in stage three where students begin to count the number of seats in "mega-theaters". For each of these five problems they:

* Read drawings and representations.
* Connect to abstract number sentences.
* Use known facts to solve larger facts.
* Use the distributive property.

4. Stage 4: There is an extensive open ended element to this problem. This is where the entire project differentiates, as they choose a ticket price (this is internationally friendly-the amount is open ended without a label), and then they calculate the potential revenue of all of the theaters.

There is an answer key at the end of the project. Check out the preview to try out one of each of the first three stages.

The Cupcake Shop

Students are asked to become managers of this bakery cupcake shop! This is an in-depth look at groups and the conceptual understanding behind multiplication. This is a perfect project for those students that continually mix up the difference between groups vs. the number in a group, or if they struggle to understand the meaning behind multiplication number sentences. It is also great fact practice as it starts with facts in the 3s, and gets harder as they go. The majority of the facts covered are 3s, 4s, and 5s.

This entire project uses the Concrete- Representational-Abstract instructional sequence. As they move along in the project, they move along in the steps. This approach is explained here:

1. When a student is introduced to a new concept or something unfamiliar, you allow the use of tools. (Concrete)

2. When the student can perform the task, they move on to representing the concept with drawings or pictures. (Representational)

3. When the student can master the task with a drawing or a picture they move to using only numbers and symbols. (Abstract)


What is in the problem?

There are 3 stages within this giant problem (Stages 1 and 2 have between 5 and 10 tasks in it) walking the student through what they need to do. The 3rd stage is open ended and is great for differentiating the project. The problems integrate math, reading and a bit of writing. It is challenging, parts of it are open ended, and is a perfect way to practice performance tasks. Everything you need for the problem is included, and the preview has one of each of the first two stages for you to try. The only thing you will need is a material for the students to actually build the cupcake boxes. You could use counters, cubes or any sort of marker that will allow them to work concretely in the first stage.

You will notice that the Standards for Mathematical Practice are embedded within these performance tasks.

What age are the problems appropriate for?

These challenges are appropriate for 2nd graders that may be ready to explore multiplication, 3rd graders who are beginning multiplication, and for struggling 4th graders. I currently use this in my 4th grade intervention group, which is a full year behind their peers.

How can this problem be used?

There are many ways you can use this performance task:

* Fast finisher activity
* Small group work
* Homework for students
* Gifted and talented small groups
* Intervention small groups
* Whole class activity


The problem steps and their curricular focus:

1. Stage 1: In this stage there are five problems in which students are given stories about the cupcake orders. For each of the 5 problems they:

* Build concrete models.
* Draw representations of those models.
* Connect to abstract number sentences.

2. Stage 2: In this stage there are ten problems in which students fill orders for problems. Initially there are diagrams which are objects, then numbers and then some numbers are missing. For each of the problems they:

* Read drawings and representations.
* Connect to abstract number sentences.

4. Stage 3: There is an extensive open ended element to this problem. This is where the entire project differentiates, as they choose a cupcake price (this is internationally friendly-the amount is open ended without a label), and then they calculate the potential revenue of all of the cupcakes ordered.

There is an answer key at the end of the project.

Total Pages
184
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
1 Year

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Math Performance Tasks Complete Bundle
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