Math Problem-Solving Unit {Upton Understanding Fish} Distance Learning

Math Problem-Solving Unit {Upton Understanding Fish} Distance Learning
File Type

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(33 MB|72 pages)
Standards
  • Product Description
  • StandardsNEW
Math Intervention: Our CCSS aligned math intervention unit provides 14-20 days worth of differentiated problem-solving activities to give students the strategies they need to solve word problems. Perfect for general education, special education, RTI and math intervention! Can be used with students in grades K-3.

Upton the Understanding Fish is the latest strategy animal in Problem-Solving Pond series. Upton teaches students mathematical understanding which means that students can analyze story problem and follow problem-solving steps. This unit breaks each component of mathematical understanding into mini-lessons and accompanying practice pages. Students learn how to:
1. Read the problem and underline the question.
2. Bracket important info. & cross out unnecessary info.
3. Use key words to determine the operation.
4. Restate the problem; determine what is being asked to solve.
5. Write a number sentence to represent the problem.

This unit uses a spiral review format so each mathematical understanding lesson builds upon previous lessons. This ensures that students get ample practice of these critical skills.

Upton's unit includes:

--Introduction to Problem-Solving Pond Unit
--Debuting Upton the Understanding Fish
--Suggestions for Use
--Detailed math intervention lesson plans using gradual release of responsibility
--Keywords for Mathematical Operations Anchor Chart
--Upton's Problem-Solving Steps Anchor Chart
--12 problem-solving practice pages with differentiation and reflection opportunities
--Student-friendly learning scale
--Essential Questions, Self-Reflection Stems and Discussion Prompts file
--3 problem-solving rubrics
--Hazel Meets the Strategy Animals book

BEST VALUE - Math Problem Solving Essentials Bundle {K-3}
Contains an entire year's worth of math intervention problem solving lessons and activities with the following strategy animals:

--Modeling Mouse
--Drawing Dragonfly
--Tallying Toad
--Counting Crocodile
--Hopping Hare
--Tabling Turtle
--Break-Apart Badger
--Equating Earthworm
--Upton Understanding Fish
Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Look for and make use of structure. Mathematically proficient students look closely to discern a pattern or structure. Young students, for example, might notice that three and seven more is the same amount as seven and three more, or they may sort a collection of shapes according to how many sides the shapes have. Later, students will see 7 Γ— 8 equals the well remembered 7 Γ— 5 + 7 Γ— 3, in preparation for learning about the distributive property. In the expression π‘₯Β² + 9π‘₯ + 14, older students can see the 14 as 2 Γ— 7 and the 9 as 2 + 7. They recognize the significance of an existing line in a geometric figure and can use the strategy of drawing an auxiliary line for solving problems. They also can step back for an overview and shift perspective. They can see complicated things, such as some algebraic expressions, as single objects or as being composed of several objects. For example, they can see 5 – 3(π‘₯ – 𝑦)Β² as 5 minus a positive number times a square and use that to realize that its value cannot be more than 5 for any real numbers π‘₯ and 𝑦.
Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might, depending on the context of the problem, transform algebraic expressions or change the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need. Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw diagrams of important features and relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize and solve a problem. Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different method, and they continually ask themselves, "Does this make sense?" They can understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences between different approaches.
Total Pages
72 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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