Math Rack Cards and Activities

Math Rack Cards and Activities
Math Rack Cards and Activities
Math Rack Cards and Activities
Math Rack Cards and Activities
Math Rack Cards and Activities
Math Rack Cards and Activities
Math Rack Cards and Activities
Math Rack Cards and Activities
Grade Levels
File Type

PDF

(314 KB|17 pages)
Product Rating
4.0
(1 Rating)
Standards
  • Product Description
  • StandardsNEW
In this pack you will find 50 different math rack cards. They are ready to be printed, cut, and laminated. You will also find table tent directions for students for four different math rack station games.

Math Rack Flip - Students flip over a math rack card onto a recording sheet (included in this pack). They fill out the sheet using a white board marker with the number on the rack and how they saw the number.

What's My Number - Students sit across from a partner. They build a number on their personal math rack and show it to their partner briefly. The other partner has to tell them the number that was shown on the rack.

Match My Number - Students sit across from a partner. Both partners have their own math rack. One partner builds a number on their rack and briefly shows it. The other partner then builds the same number on their rack.

Build It! - Students flip over a number card (included in this pack). They build the number on their math rack. They can then try to build the number a different way.

These cards and stations are great for building subitizing skills, number sense, and fact fluency. My students loved these activities! I hope yours will too!

*Please note that three of the stations require students to have their own math racks. These can be purchased at teacher stores or easily made with cardboard, pipe cleaners, and beads.
Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 - 4 = 13 - 3 - 1 = 10 - 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 - 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).
Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).
Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)
Total Pages
17 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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