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Math Talks: Place Value

Math Talks: Place Value
Math Talks: Place Value
Math Talks: Place Value
Math Talks: Place Value
Math Talks: Place Value
Math Talks: Place Value
Math Talks: Place Value
Math Talks: Place Value
Product Description
Math Talks: Place Value

This activity was created to help support and guide math talks in your classroom. In order to get started, print the worksheets onto cardstock. Cut the pages in half. Punch and hole at the top corner and put a ring on to hold them altogether.

Hold the card up for all the students to see. Allow them some think time. Remind students to not shout out when holding the cards up. When they know the answer have them put their thumbs up on their chest. When you have given students ample think time turn the card around. Ask the students what number they saw. Call on those with thumbs ups.

For some inspiration, here is a link to a great video of a kinder class doing a number talk. The way the teacher is allowing the think time and posing the questions is a great way to use these cards.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWyDGUUUDJE

Using these cards is simple because all you really need is one teacher set. You can color the blocks or print them on colored cardstock.

**Standards**
Kindergarten
Work with numbers 11-19 to gain foundations for place value.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.K.NBT.A.1
Compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and some further ones, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each composition or decomposition by a drawing or equation (such as 18 = 10 + 8); understand that these numbers are composed of ten ones and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

First Grade
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.1.NBT.B.2
Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. Understand the following as special cases:
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.1.NBT.B.2.A
10 can be thought of as a bundle of ten ones — called a "ten."
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.1.NBT.B.2.B
The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

Second Grade
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.NBT.A.1
Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones. Understand the following as special cases:
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.NBT.A.1.A
100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens — called a "hundred."
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.NBT.A.1.B
The numbers 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine hundreds (and 0 tens and 0 ones).

-----What's Included-------
18 cards
Covers ones, tens and hundreds place
Adaptable to fit your needs
Whole Class or small group activity
1 blank card
Total Pages
N/A
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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