Media Literacy Filler Lesson: Why is news "sensational?"

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2.83 MB   |   CW: 5 pages; PPT: 7 slides pages

PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

This is an optional lesson that can be used at any point in my Media Literacy curriculum or even on its own. Students will work in groups, pretending to be a team working for the NBC Nightly News. Their task is decide which stories they should feature in their 30-minute broadcast, and then reflect on why they were chosen. Students then discuss the term "sensational" and why news stories are often sensationalized.

My lessons include an interactive PowerPoint with instructional notes for the teacher in the "notes" section of the PPT. It also includes a complete and printable classwork packet for students in .docx form. Classwork includes a Do Now and Exit Ticket.

This particular lesson also includes a group participation rubric in case you wish to grade students' teamwork.
Total Pages
CW: 5 pages; PPT: 7 slides
Answer Key
Included with Rubric
Teaching Duration
50 Minutes

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Media Literacy Filler Lesson: Why is news "sensational?"
Media Literacy Filler Lesson: Why is news "sensational?"
Media Literacy Filler Lesson: Why is news "sensational?"
Media Literacy Filler Lesson: Why is news "sensational?"
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