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Metaphor Framing Cards: Lesson closure, debrief, and summary activity

Metaphor Framing Cards: Lesson closure, debrief, and summary activity
Metaphor Framing Cards: Lesson closure, debrief, and summary activity
Metaphor Framing Cards: Lesson closure, debrief, and summary activity
Metaphor Framing Cards: Lesson closure, debrief, and summary activity
Metaphor Framing Cards: Lesson closure, debrief, and summary activity
Metaphor Framing Cards: Lesson closure, debrief, and summary activity
Metaphor Framing Cards: Lesson closure, debrief, and summary activity
Metaphor Framing Cards: Lesson closure, debrief, and summary activity
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What: Metaphoric Framing Cards
Who: Give to students or staff at the end of your lesson
How: They work nicely laminated or placed into zip lock bags.
Why: These are great for visual and tactile learners. The process really helps solidify the learning experience and lead to knowledge retention.
Procedure: Randomly distribute these to participants, or allow your participants to select a card to make it feel more fun. Then ask the student to summarize the day’s lesson using the card as a metaphor. You will be surprised how much even your low level students will get into this.
Example Card: Today’s lesson on internal conflict reminds me of the butterfly. The butterfly is like the character who on the outside appears to be healthy and happy. Only the close observer will notice the shadow that lurks behind the butterfly, following it everywhere he goes. The shadow is the internal conflict. The butterfly (character) will have to learn to confront the conflict or forever be followed by its mental shadow.
Example Card: Today’s lesson on embedding quotes reminds me of this image of the lion. The face of the lion is the quote I have pulled from my source. The mane reminds me that the quote must be framed with my own wording and situations to maintain the power and integrity of the lion/quote. The top of the mane is the signal phrase but the darker underside of the mane is the citation at the end. The lion would be incomplete without both.

This is also a great way to enforce knowledge of metaphors in the ELA or English classroom while studying literature.
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