Middle Ages Meme Project and Stations Lesson

Grade Levels
7th - 10th
Standards
Resource Type
Formats Included
  • PDF
Pages
16 pages
$3.50
$3.50
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Description

This Middle Ages Feudalism lesson plan has students analyze primary source images and then create a Meme that illustrates medieval life.

Included is a full lesson plan detailing how to structure each part of your class. There are introductory video links and a background reading on the medieval illuminated manuscript images to get started.

Next, students receive a worksheet to move through 12 stations, each with a beautiful primary source image depicting life in Europe during the Middle Ages. Students take notes on what they see as they move through the stations, with each representing a month of the year.

Next, students go to a Google Drive page with meme templates for each of the 12 stations. They use these to create a meme that demonstrates what they learned about life in the Middle Ages.

This is a really fun lesson for students that also allows you to get them analyzing primary sources and making connections!

You can also download this lesson as part of my Europe's Middle Ages & Medieval Unit Bundle!

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Total Pages
16 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
90 minutes
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively, causally).
Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author’s point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).
Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.

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