Multiplication Facts Strategy Instruction and Fact Fluency Intervention Kit

Grade Levels
2nd - 5th
Standards
Formats Included
  • PDF
Pages
160 pages
$12.95
$12.95
Share this resource

Description

We want students to become “fluent” with their multiplication math facts. We want students to be able to access these multiplication facts in their brains the same way that they retrieve basic sight words—without processing. The way to do that is to ensure they truly understand the concept of multiplication and have learned the strategies necessary to make sense of it.

For many students, flashcards and rote memorization simply don’t work—they need to understand the patterns and relationships that are a part of multiplication facts. This resource is full of games and activities to help you teach your students about multiplication--and to provide engaging tools to help RETEACH in intervention groups when needed!

One method that works VERY well for many students and can build into bigger number multiplication is the use of arrays; this concept is a key part of this resource. Please note that there are array builder tiles at the beginning of this resource that are a fantastic way to build visual understanding of multiplication and the idea of “groups of”. Believe it or not, even arrays can be too abstract for some students; for real strugglers, I even put an item (a cube, a bean, etc) on each mark on the array to see that the “dot” really stands for an object. Keep that in mind if students don’t seem to be grasping the idea of “groups of”.

Many people teach multiplication facts in “order”…start with the 0’s and move to the 12’s. This resource helps students see relationships so it groups multiplication facts in ways that promote teaching in strategic ways—not just memorization. It makes sense to teach 5’s and 10’s together because they are connected. Similarly, 2’s and 4’s and 8’s group well together. Although there are parts of this resource that tackle the 11 and 12 facts, there are very few times where these facts are necessary, so they are downplayed in this resource.

Please make sure—especially if you are using this as an intervention resource—to move as slowly as necessary. Teach multiplication strategies. Model the strategies. Repeat the strategies until it is obvious that students understand them. THEN move to the practice activities and games to build automaticity. It is no value to practice inefficient strategies—so get students working strategically and THEN work to increase speed. It may take longer than you think—but you can’t rush understanding.

This resource is meant to provide a variety of multiplication fact activities that are NOT fill in the blank worksheets to support strategy instruction to be used whole class as a part of instruction or in small intervention groups to build skills. These activities are easy to prepare and perfect to use as teaching tools and then later to build fluency through repeated practice. Whether this practice happens in a math workshop, with an intervention group, or even sent home for additional practice, everything is easy to print and prepare and can be used over and over.

Whether you teach multiplication facts to your whole class and are looking for games and activities to help provide fluency practice--or if you teach an upper grade where students need intervention in this area, I hope you will find this resource a helpful tool.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Please download the preview to see a sample of what is included in each section--including actual photographs of the resource in action. I hope your students will benefit from this interactive resource the way mine have!

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Looking for more multiplication resources?

◆This innovative set of differentiated challenge cards asks students to solve multiplication problems in a totally new way!

◆Want to try some multiplication math sorts? All directions are included with photos, teaching tips, and more!

◆Need some multiplication formative assessments? See what you think!

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

All rights reserved by ©The Teacher Studio. Purchase of this resource entitles the purchaser the right to reproduce the pages in limited quantities for single classroom use only. Duplication for an entire school, an entire school system, or commercial purposes is strictly forbidden without written permission from the author at fourthgradestudio@gmail.com. Additional licenses are available at a reduced price.

Total Pages
160 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
Report this Resource to TpT
Reported resources will be reviewed by our team. Report this resource to let us know if this resource violates TpT’s content guidelines.

Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is prime or composite.
Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers.
Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide. Examples: If 6 × 4 = 24 is known, then 4 × 6 = 24 is also known. (Commutative property of multiplication.) 3 × 5 × 2 can be found by 3 × 5 = 15, then 15 × 2 = 30, or by 5 × 2 = 10, then 3 × 10 = 30. (Associative property of multiplication.) Knowing that 8 × 5 = 40 and 8 × 2 = 16, one can find 8 × 7 as 8 × (5 + 2) = (8 × 5) + (8 × 2) = 40 + 16 = 56. (Distributive property.)
Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.
Use addition to find the total number of objects arranged in rectangular arrays with up to 5 rows and up to 5 columns; write an equation to express the total as a sum of equal addends.

Reviews

Questions & Answers

Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials.

More About Us

Keep in Touch!

Sign Up