Multiplication Games

Grade Levels
2nd - 5th, Homeschool
Standards
Resource Type
Formats Included
  • PDF
Pages
26 pages
$3.00
$3.00
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Description

Having trouble with your students not knowing their multiplication facts?

Sometimes it is just so hard for some students to memorize them! Your students will love this multiplication game and be begging to play!

Cover Up is an engaging game for learning multiplication facts to 12. Using regular number cubes and BINGO MARKERS or Colored Discs, your students will enjoy learning the facts!

This can be used as a station game for the entire year. Just change out the cards as needed.

Here's what's included:

  • One game board for each of the facts 2 Times Tables through 12 Times Tables (11 Pages)

The numbers are in order on the game cards. Ex. 2, 4, 6, 8 …..

  • One game board for each of the facts 2 Times Tables through 12 Times Tables (11 Pages)

The numbers are in no particular order on the game cards. Ex. 12, 2, 24, 10, 6...

• Directions Pages

• Fact Recording Sheet

Check out the preview for a better look.

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Total Pages
26 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide. Examples: If 6 × 4 = 24 is known, then 4 × 6 = 24 is also known. (Commutative property of multiplication.) 3 × 5 × 2 can be found by 3 × 5 = 15, then 15 × 2 = 30, or by 5 × 2 = 10, then 3 × 10 = 30. (Associative property of multiplication.) Knowing that 8 × 5 = 40 and 8 × 2 = 16, one can find 8 × 7 as 8 × (5 + 2) = (8 × 5) + (8 × 2) = 40 + 16 = 56. (Distributive property.)
Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.

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