Multiplication Strategies

Grade Levels
3rd - 4th
Standards
Formats Included
  • PDF (25 pages)
$3.00
$3.00
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Description

I created these activities for my 3rd graders to use in centers during math. I really wanted to help them focus on different ways to show a basic multiplication fact. Download includes:

"Multiplication 4-Ways"

4 different pages that ask students to show a multiplication problem as a fact family, array, equal group, word problem, number line, or repeated addition

"Multiplication Spinners"

4 versions of "Spin an Array" (easier facts/harder facts) plus black and white (for printing on colored paper)

2 versions of "Spin Equal Groups" (color and black and white)

2 different answer sheets for center work

"Multiplication Puzzle Pieces"

10 different sets of multiplication puzzles (4 pieces per puzzle that show each fact in 4 different ways)

1 recording sheet to show answers of facts

1 puzzle piece sheet that allows students to create their own puzzles

Total Pages
25 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers.
Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide. Examples: If 6 × 4 = 24 is known, then 4 × 6 = 24 is also known. (Commutative property of multiplication.) 3 × 5 × 2 can be found by 3 × 5 = 15, then 15 × 2 = 30, or by 5 × 2 = 10, then 3 × 10 = 30. (Associative property of multiplication.) Knowing that 8 × 5 = 40 and 8 × 2 = 16, one can find 8 × 7 as 8 × (5 + 2) = (8 × 5) + (8 × 2) = 40 + 16 = 56. (Distributive property.)
Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.

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