Multiplication Worksheet with KEY Partners Different Problem Same Answer

Multiplication Worksheet with KEY Partners Different Problem Same Answer
Multiplication Worksheet with KEY Partners Different Problem Same Answer
Multiplication Worksheet with KEY Partners Different Problem Same Answer
Multiplication Worksheet with KEY Partners Different Problem Same Answer
Multiplication Worksheet with KEY Partners Different Problem Same Answer
Multiplication Worksheet with KEY Partners Different Problem Same Answer
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(162 KB|2 pages)
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You will LOVE this quick, informative, multiplication practice to assess students' ability to multiply one digit by two digits and two digits by two digits. Multiplication Different Problem, Same Answer Partner Practice Problems. You print, then cut apart (down the middle half-dotted line) of the paper. Give one student "Partner A," and his/her partner "Partner B," side of the worksheet. After both students show their work and complete, they can compare answers with their partner. As you'll see in the Answer KEY, they both have the same answers to question #1, then #2, etc. It's GREAT for students to discuss who's right and who made a mistake, and help critique each other. This is something you'll use year after year.

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Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Look for and make use of structure. Mathematically proficient students look closely to discern a pattern or structure. Young students, for example, might notice that three and seven more is the same amount as seven and three more, or they may sort a collection of shapes according to how many sides the shapes have. Later, students will see 7 × 8 equals the well remembered 7 × 5 + 7 × 3, in preparation for learning about the distributive property. In the expression 𝑥² + 9𝑥 + 14, older students can see the 14 as 2 × 7 and the 9 as 2 + 7. They recognize the significance of an existing line in a geometric figure and can use the strategy of drawing an auxiliary line for solving problems. They also can step back for an overview and shift perspective. They can see complicated things, such as some algebraic expressions, as single objects or as being composed of several objects. For example, they can see 5 – 3(𝑥 – 𝑦)² as 5 minus a positive number times a square and use that to realize that its value cannot be more than 5 for any real numbers 𝑥 and 𝑦.
Fluently multiply multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.
Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one-digit whole number, and multiply two two-digit numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.
Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10–90 (e.g., 9 × 80, 5 × 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.
Total Pages
2 pages
Answer Key
Included
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N/A
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