NGSS MS LS1-7 Food Molecules-Molecules to Organisms PowerPoint

NGSS MS LS1-7 Food Molecules-Molecules to Organisms PowerPoint
NGSS MS LS1-7 Food Molecules-Molecules to Organisms PowerPoint
NGSS MS LS1-7 Food Molecules-Molecules to Organisms PowerPoint
NGSS MS LS1-7 Food Molecules-Molecules to Organisms PowerPoint
NGSS MS LS1-7 Food Molecules-Molecules to Organisms PowerPoint
NGSS MS LS1-7 Food Molecules-Molecules to Organisms PowerPoint
NGSS MS LS1-7 Food Molecules-Molecules to Organisms PowerPoint
NGSS MS LS1-7 Food Molecules-Molecules to Organisms PowerPoint
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NGSS MS LS1-7 Food Molecules-Molecules to Organisms PowerPoint

Meant as a resource for background knowledge, not a student performance tool or model. Check out my NGSS MS LS1-7 to check for understanding.

Can be edited for younger or older learners.

MAIN IDEA-Food is rearranged through chemical reactions forming new molecules that support growth and/or release energy as this matter moves through an organism.

LS1.C:Organization for Matter and Energy Flow in Organisms.

Within individual organisms, food moves through a series of chemical reactions in which it is broken down and rearranged to…

Form new molecules

Support growth

Release energy

PS3.D: Energy in Chemical Processes and Everyday Life.

Cellular respiration in plants and animals involve chemical reactions with oxygen that release stored energy.

In these processes, complex molecules containing carbon react with oxygen to produce carbon dioxide and other materials (secondary).

Chemical Reaction-a process in which one or more substances, the reactants, are converted to one or more different substances, the products.

A chemical reaction rearranges the constituent atoms of the reactants to create different substances as products.

In chemical reactions, energy is either absorbed or released.

In chemical reactions, atoms rearrange.

Rearrangement involves some form of energy, usually thermal energy.

Ex.) The light and sound of fireworks are two forms of released energy.

Molecules of food, which are complex carbon-containing molecules.

Food Molecules. One "subunit" of a food molecule. Glucose, amino acids, fatty acids, and glycerol are all monomers. A collection of monomers (or subunits) put together in a food molecule.

Our intake of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins supply us with carbon in the form of large molecules called macronutrients.

Oxygen

These chemicals contain energy that is stored in amongst the bonds holding the atoms together. We store the food we eat and combine it with oxygen in a chemical reaction.

During this chemical reaction bonds holding atoms together are broken and energy is released. It is this energy that keeps us alive and able to exercise.

Energy

Energy can be released or absorbed during chemical reactions between food and oxygen.

We talk about consuming calories, but how can we eat heat? As we digest and metabolize the food, chemical reactions release energy that our bodies can use to fuel other processes that require it, and if the ultimate products of metabolism are the same as they are for combustion {CO2(g) and H2O(l)}, the energy released in the body will be the same as the heat released when the food is burned.

Plants apply a chemical reaction called photosynthesis to convert carbon dioxide and water into food (glucose) and oxygen. It's one of the most common everyday chemical reactions and also one of the most important, because this is how plants produce food for themselves and animals and convert carbon dioxide into oxygen. The equation for the reaction is:

6 CO2 + 6 H2O + light → C​6H12O6 + 6 O2

Aerobic cellular respiration is the opposite process of photosynthesis in that energy molecules are combined with the oxygen we breathe to release ​the energy needed by our cells plus carbon dioxide and water. Energy used by cells is chemical energy in the form of ATP, or adenosine triphosphate.

Here is the overall equation for aerobic cellular respiration:

C6H12O6 + 6O2 → 6CO2 + 6H2O + energy (36 ATPs)

Energy is stored in reacting molecules.

The law of conservation of energy-states that energy cannot be created or destroyed, simply changed from one form to another.

Law of Conservation of Mass-mass cannot be created or destroyed.

The number of atoms in the reactants must equal the number of atoms in the products.

The number of each type of atom being the same before and after chemical reactions, indicating that the matter ingested as food is conserved as it moves through an organism to support growth.

All matter (atoms) used by the organism for growth comes from the products of the chemical reactions involving the matter taken in by the organism.

Food molecules taken in by the organism are broken down and can then be rearranged to become the molecules that comprise the organism (e.g., the proteins and other molecules in a hamburger can be broken down and used to make a variety of tissues in humans).

As food molecules are rearranged, energy is released and can be used to support other processes within the organism.

Summary

Molecules are broken apart and put back together and that in this process, energy is released.

Food is rearranged through chemical reactions forming new molecules that support growth and/or release energy as this matter moves through an organism.

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