NUMBER SENSE "Can you make it?"

NUMBER SENSE "Can you make it?"
NUMBER SENSE "Can you make it?"
NUMBER SENSE "Can you make it?"
NUMBER SENSE "Can you make it?"
NUMBER SENSE "Can you make it?"
NUMBER SENSE "Can you make it?"
NUMBER SENSE "Can you make it?"
NUMBER SENSE "Can you make it?"
File Type

Zip

(10 MB|20 pages)
Standards
  • Product Description
  • Standards
Many of our students see numbers in a very rigid way. These “Can you make it?” activities allow them to explore numbers by composing and decomposing multiple ways! These divergent thinking activities are also called “low floor and high ceiling” tasks. This means, some students may choose quite simple equations to compose a number, while other students will reach more complicated, multi-step algorithms. That makes easy, no-prep differentiation! My students love these challenges! Their enthusiasm is contagious, and before you know it, you will see students making huge progress in their ability to see numbers in new and flexible ways! When our students see numbers flexibly, it will help them to understand algebraic thinking further down the road. It will also make more sense when children learn multiple algorithms for an operation (ex. distributive property, partial products, area models, etc.)

Perfect for a math warm-up activity, learning centers,or sponge time!

Purchase includes:
Smartboard file with 10 slides and sample solutions
10 worksheets (black and white)
10 worksheets (color)
Directions for using in class
Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Look for and make use of structure. Mathematically proficient students look closely to discern a pattern or structure. Young students, for example, might notice that three and seven more is the same amount as seven and three more, or they may sort a collection of shapes according to how many sides the shapes have. Later, students will see 7 × 8 equals the well remembered 7 × 5 + 7 × 3, in preparation for learning about the distributive property. In the expression 𝑥² + 9𝑥 + 14, older students can see the 14 as 2 × 7 and the 9 as 2 + 7. They recognize the significance of an existing line in a geometric figure and can use the strategy of drawing an auxiliary line for solving problems. They also can step back for an overview and shift perspective. They can see complicated things, such as some algebraic expressions, as single objects or as being composed of several objects. For example, they can see 5 – 3(𝑥 – 𝑦)² as 5 minus a positive number times a square and use that to realize that its value cannot be more than 5 for any real numbers 𝑥 and 𝑦.
Total Pages
20 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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