New Year's Day Writing Activity: Dynamite Resolutions for the New Year

Connie
1.5k Followers
Grade Levels
6th - 12th, Homeschool
Standards
Formats Included
  • PDF
Pages
1 page
$1.25
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Connie
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Description

Spark your students' thinking after the long break with this terrific activity where they make resolutions that characters from their readings would make.

For this lesson, "New Year's Day Writing Activity: Dynamite Resolutions for the New Year," students will choose five people from any of the reading they have completed so far this school year, and will create a New Year’s Resolution for each one. Each decision must be one that fits the character’s disposition, morals, values and temperament.

After the students create this pledge, they must explain

• why the character made this decision, and

• why this is a logical choice for him/her.

They must also include the title and author for each story that they use.

To score this activity, allot 1 point each for the character, the title and the author; 3 points for each Resolution, and 4 points for the Reason -10 points per each character response, and 50 points for the whole worksheet..

Example:

Character: Goldilocks; Goldilocks and The Three Bears; Robert Southly

Resolution: I vow never to break into anyone’s house again.

Reason: My parents grounded me for breaking and entering, eating the Bear family’s food, destroying their furniture and messing up their beds. For three weeks I had to eat cold porridge, sit in a wooden chair and sleep on a wooden pallet with no mattress. That was no fun.

This lesson promises to add more bricks to students’ academic homes while they prove the premise that Learning is Fun.

Happy Teaching,

Connie

#new years 2015

Total Pages
1 page
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
Unknown
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.
Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

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