Next Generation Science 2nd Grade Biodiversity in Ecosystems Complete Unit

Next Generation Science 2nd Grade Biodiversity in Ecosystems Complete Unit
Next Generation Science 2nd Grade Biodiversity in Ecosystems Complete Unit
Next Generation Science 2nd Grade Biodiversity in Ecosystems Complete Unit
Next Generation Science 2nd Grade Biodiversity in Ecosystems Complete Unit
Next Generation Science 2nd Grade Biodiversity in Ecosystems Complete Unit
Next Generation Science 2nd Grade Biodiversity in Ecosystems Complete Unit
Next Generation Science 2nd Grade Biodiversity in Ecosystems Complete Unit
Next Generation Science 2nd Grade Biodiversity in Ecosystems Complete Unit
Grade Levels
File Type

PDF

(92 MB|75 pages)
Standards
  • Product Description
  • StandardsNEW
This unit is designed to do 2 things:
1) Meet Next Generation Science Standards for 2nd Grade: Biodiversity in Ecosystems, AND
2) Make your life EASIER!
Included is everything (well, almost everything) you need for this unit. The teaching of science requires some materials, but I have chosen simple, everyday tools you most likely already have in your classroom.
There are 13 lessons in this unit (including writing a script that answers a question for informative writing), covering major standards under Next Generation Science Standards— Biodiversity in Ecosystems, PLUS the cross-cutting concepts AND connections to ELA and Math Common Core.

Unit Overview
Lesson 1: I can make observations of plants to compare the diversity of life in different habitats. (direct observations OR media-based)
Lesson 2: I can make observations of animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats. (direct observations OR media-based)
Lesson 3: I can explain how many different species of living things live on land and water in the _____________ habitat.
Lesson 4: I can participate in shared research to produce a script that will answer a question.
Lesson 5: (Optional—record scripts as podcast segments (audio only) or a vodcast (with visual supports). I can participate in reading and recording my script that answers a question.
Lesson 6: I can plan an investigation to determine if plants need sunlight and water to grow.
Lesson 7: I can conduct an investigation to determine if plants needs sunlight and water to grow.
Lesson 8: I can use collected data to draw a picture and bar graph to represent the data sets and make comparisons.
Lesson 9: I can look for patterns and order when making observations about the world.
I can show how events have causes that generate observable patterns using data from my plant investigation. I can use evidence to show that plants depend on water and light to grow.
Lesson 10: I can show how the shape and stability of structures in plants are related to their functions.
Lesson 11: I can show how the shape and stability of structures in creatures that pollinate plants are related to their functions.
Lesson 12: I can explain why plants depend on animals for pollination or seed dispersal.
Lesson 13: I can develop a model that mimics the function of an animal dispersing seeds or pollinating plants.

Also included is a unit vocabulary test!

*Email primarilyteaching@gmail.com after your purchase to request the FREE whiteboard version of this unit (SmartNotebook or ActivInspire versions available)! Include your TpT username so purchase can be verified. :)
Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Use appropriate tools strategically. Mathematically proficient students consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem. These tools might include pencil and paper, concrete models, a ruler, a protractor, a calculator, a spreadsheet, a computer algebra system, a statistical package, or dynamic geometry software. Proficient students are sufficiently familiar with tools appropriate for their grade or course to make sound decisions about when each of these tools might be helpful, recognizing both the insight to be gained and their limitations. For example, mathematically proficient high school students analyze graphs of functions and solutions generated using a graphing calculator. They detect possible errors by strategically using estimation and other mathematical knowledge. When making mathematical models, they know that technology can enable them to visualize the results of varying assumptions, explore consequences, and compare predictions with data. Mathematically proficient students at various grade levels are able to identify relevant external mathematical resources, such as digital content located on a website, and use them to pose or solve problems. They are able to use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts.
Model with mathematics. Mathematically proficient students can apply the mathematics they know to solve problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace. In early grades, this might be as simple as writing an addition equation to describe a situation. In middle grades, a student might apply proportional reasoning to plan a school event or analyze a problem in the community. By high school, a student might use geometry to solve a design problem or use a function to describe how one quantity of interest depends on another. Mathematically proficient students who can apply what they know are comfortable making assumptions and approximations to simplify a complicated situation, realizing that these may need revision later. They are able to identify important quantities in a practical situation and map their relationships using such tools as diagrams, two-way tables, graphs, flowcharts and formulas. They can analyze those relationships mathematically to draw conclusions. They routinely interpret their mathematical results in the context of the situation and reflect on whether the results make sense, possibly improving the model if it has not served its purpose.
Reason abstractly and quantitatively. Mathematically proficient students make sense of quantities and their relationships in problem situations. They bring two complementary abilities to bear on problems involving quantitative relationships: the ability to decontextualize-to abstract a given situation and represent it symbolically and manipulate the representing symbols as if they have a life of their own, without necessarily attending to their referents-and the ability to contextualize, to pause as needed during the manipulation process in order to probe into the referents for the symbols involved. Quantitative reasoning entails habits of creating a coherent representation of the problem at hand; considering the units involved; attending to the meaning of quantities, not just how to compute them; and knowing and flexibly using different properties of operations and objects.
Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.
Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., read a number of books on a single topic to produce a report; record science observations).
Total Pages
75 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
1 month
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