Next Generation Science 4th Grade Waves Complete Unit

Next Generation Science 4th Grade Waves Complete Unit
Next Generation Science 4th Grade Waves Complete Unit
Next Generation Science 4th Grade Waves Complete Unit
Next Generation Science 4th Grade Waves Complete Unit
Next Generation Science 4th Grade Waves Complete Unit
Next Generation Science 4th Grade Waves Complete Unit
Next Generation Science 4th Grade Waves Complete Unit
Next Generation Science 4th Grade Waves Complete Unit
Grade Levels
File Type

PDF

(75 MB|121 pages)
Standards
  • Product Description
  • StandardsNEW

This unit is designed to do 2 things:

1) Meet Next Generation Science Standards for 4th Grade: Waves, AND 2) Make your life EASIER!

Included is everything (well, almost everything) you need for this unit. The teaching of science requires some materials, but I have chosen simple, everyday tools you most likely already have in your classroom.

There are 18 lessons in this unit (including writing a script that answers a question for informative writing), covering major standards under Next Generation Science Standards—Waves, PLUS the cross-cutting concepts AND connections to ELA and Math Common Core! After purchasing, instructions for requesting a FREE WHITEBOARD version of your choice are included!

Unit Overview

Building Background Knowledge

Lesson 1: I can identify properties of waves.

I can develop a model using an analogy, example, or abstract representation to describe a scientific principle.

I can demonstrate how waves can be made in water by disturbing the surface.

Lesson 2: I can refer to details and examples in a 4th grade level text about waves when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

Lesson 3: I can integrate information from two texts about waves in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

Lesson 4: I can add audio recordings and visual displays to

presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.

Lesson 5: I can demonstrate that there is no net motion in the direction of a wave in deep water, except when the water meets a beach.

Lesson 6: I can give examples of how science findings are based on recognizing patterns.

I can explain how similarities and differences in patterns can be used to sort and classify natural phenomena of waves.

I can explain how waves of the same type can differ in amplitude (height of the wave) and wavelength (spacing between wave peaks).

Developing a Model

Lesson 7: I can develop a model of waves to describe patterns in terms of amplitude and wavelength and that waves can cause objects to move.

I can model with mathematics.

I can draw points, lines, line segments, rays, angles (right, acute, obtuse), and perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify these in two dimensional figures.

Applying New Knowledge (of Waves to Communication Devices)

Lesson 8: I can explain how knowledge of relevant scientific concepts and research findings is important in engineering communication devices.

Lesson 9: I can explain how digitized information can be transmitted over long distances without significant degradation.

I can explain how high-tech devices, such as computers or cell phones, can receive and decode information and convert it from digitized form to voice and vice versa.

I can explain how similarities and differences in patterns can be used to sort and classify designed products.

Influence of Science and Change Over Time

Lesson 10: I can describe how the influence of science, engineering, and technology on society and the natural world have changed over time, as well as the demands for new and improved technologies.

Lesson 11: I can describe how engineers improve existing technologies or develop new ones to increase their benefits, decrease known risks, and meet societal demands.

I can define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes specified criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, or cost.

Engineering Improved Solutions

Lesson 12: I can research a problem before beginning to design a solution.

I can consider the desired features of a solution that would deem it successful.

Lesson 13: I can identify possible constraints (limited availability of materials and resources) to a proposed solution to a problem.

Lesson 14: I can communicate with peers about a proposed solution in order to lead to an improved design. Lesson 15: I can generate and compare multiple solutions that use patterns to transfer information. I can generate and compare multiple solutions to a problem based on how well they meet the criteria and constraints of the design solution. (Students solution from given materials.)

Lesson 16: I can determine the best proposal for a solution by comparing how well each one meets the specified criteria for success and how well each takes the constraints into account.

I can test different solutions in order to determine which of them best solves the problem, given the criteria and the constraints.

Lesson 17: I can plan and conduct an investigation collaboratively to produce data to serve as the basis for evidence, using fair tests in which variables are controlled and the number of trials considered.

Lesson 18: I can test a design to identify failure points or difficulties and make needed improvements to the design.

I can test a solution under a range of likely conditions.

I can plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved. (Making improvements.)

Also included is a unit PERFORMANCE TASK and vocabulary test!

Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Model with mathematics. Mathematically proficient students can apply the mathematics they know to solve problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace. In early grades, this might be as simple as writing an addition equation to describe a situation. In middle grades, a student might apply proportional reasoning to plan a school event or analyze a problem in the community. By high school, a student might use geometry to solve a design problem or use a function to describe how one quantity of interest depends on another. Mathematically proficient students who can apply what they know are comfortable making assumptions and approximations to simplify a complicated situation, realizing that these may need revision later. They are able to identify important quantities in a practical situation and map their relationships using such tools as diagrams, two-way tables, graphs, flowcharts and formulas. They can analyze those relationships mathematically to draw conclusions. They routinely interpret their mathematical results in the context of the situation and reflect on whether the results make sense, possibly improving the model if it has not served its purpose.
Add audio recordings and visual displays to presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.
Integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
Draw points, lines, line segments, rays, angles (right, acute, obtuse), and perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify these in two-dimensional figures.
Total Pages
121 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
1 month
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