Number of the Day 1st Grade Year Long Distance Learning Number Sense

Number of the Day 1st Grade Year Long  Distance Learning Number Sense
Number of the Day 1st Grade Year Long  Distance Learning Number Sense
Number of the Day 1st Grade Year Long  Distance Learning Number Sense
Number of the Day 1st Grade Year Long  Distance Learning Number Sense
Number of the Day 1st Grade Year Long  Distance Learning Number Sense
Number of the Day 1st Grade Year Long  Distance Learning Number Sense
Number of the Day 1st Grade Year Long  Distance Learning Number Sense
Number of the Day 1st Grade Year Long  Distance Learning Number Sense
Created ByThe Fun Factory
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    • Bundle Description
    • Standards

    This is an amazing year's worth (184+ pages) of NO PREP Morning Math in this First Grade Number of the Day, Daily Math, Place Value, Warm-up. By purchasing this year-long resource, you will save more than 30%! #Independent Work Packet

    Each month the learning objectives build on one another.

    These easy to use, (no prep for you) pages for:

    • Warm-up
    • Assessments
    • Center work
    • Homework!

    My students beg to do these!!!!

    Number of the Day or Daily Math Warm-up is full of Common Core and TEKS (for our Texans) objectives. It has been created to help students begin to think about math (numbers) in different ways.

    Teachers are saying:

    • "I love this resource. I use it as a center. I love that is offers a spiral review of skills and also touches on skills not necessarily explicit in the curriculum."
    • "This is exactly what I was looking for to help me do a math warm-up/stretch on a daily basis. To help save paper, I can put the papers under the document camera and put them into a program on my computer that allows me to write on it via the smartboard!"
    • "I have been looking for the perfect one of these and I finally found it! My students love these. Thank you"

    Objectives covered:

    • Place Value
    • Number Sense
    • Patterns
    • Skip Counting
    • Telling Time to half hour
    • Number lines
    • Recognizing value of and counting coins

    ……And much, much more!.....

    First Grade Number of the Day

    August September Number of the Day (Numbers 1-20)

    October Halloween/Fall (Numbers 25-44)

    November Thanksgiving (Numbers 45-61)

    December (Numbers 62-71)

    January (Numbers 72-91)

    February (Numbers 92-111)

    March (Numbers 112-127)

    April (Numbers 128-147)

    May (Numbers 148-167)

    June (Numbers 168-187)

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    Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
    Model with mathematics. Mathematically proficient students can apply the mathematics they know to solve problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace. In early grades, this might be as simple as writing an addition equation to describe a situation. In middle grades, a student might apply proportional reasoning to plan a school event or analyze a problem in the community. By high school, a student might use geometry to solve a design problem or use a function to describe how one quantity of interest depends on another. Mathematically proficient students who can apply what they know are comfortable making assumptions and approximations to simplify a complicated situation, realizing that these may need revision later. They are able to identify important quantities in a practical situation and map their relationships using such tools as diagrams, two-way tables, graphs, flowcharts and formulas. They can analyze those relationships mathematically to draw conclusions. They routinely interpret their mathematical results in the context of the situation and reflect on whether the results make sense, possibly improving the model if it has not served its purpose.
    Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and-if there is a flaw in an argument-explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.
    Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = ▯ - 3, 6 + 6 = ▯.
    Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 - 4 = 13 - 3 - 1 = 10 - 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 - 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).
    Fluently add and subtract within 5.
    Total Pages
    201 pages
    Answer Key
    N/A
    Teaching Duration
    N/A
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